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Recorded on: 
September 8, 2021

EventProfsCast: Full Interview with Yuvraj Saxena, Hubilo

The events industry is 'experiencing a renaissance,' says David Adler, Chairman & Founder of Bizbash. Hubilo's Senior Director of Social + Broadcast Media, Rachel Moore, talks to David about the state of the industry, how to create intimacy at events, and the impact on the rise of remote work on virtual events.

Host
Rachel Moore
Senior Director of Content & Community at Hubilo

Rachel Moore is the Director of Social and Broadcast Media at Hubilo, the hybrid event platform built for engagement and event excellence. She oversees Hubilo’s social media, influencer marketing, livestreaming, and podcasting initiatives. Rachel is also the public face of Hubilo, hosting their flagship events, their weekly livestream In Any Event, and their podcast EVENTtalks.

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Guest Speaker
David Adler
Chairman & Founder at BizBash

David Adler, Chairman and Founder of BizBash (www.bizbash.com), is a veteran media, marketing, and event industry entrepreneur. He believes that event organizers of all types need to be “high performance collaboration artists,” and he founded BizBash in 2000 to further that cause. Since then, the company has grown to be the largest B-to-B media company for the event industry with over 2.5 million user sessions annually.

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EventProfsCast: Full Interview with Yuvraj Saxena, Hubilo

Key Moments & Discussion Points

Welcoming David Adler, Chairman & Founder of BizBash
00:00 - 16:45

Rachel Moore, Sr. Director of Content at Hubilo, welcomes David to the show. David is a veteran media, marketing, and event industry entrepreneur. He founded BizBash in 2000, and since then, the company has grown to be the largest B2B media company in the events industry with over 2.5 million user sessions annually. David shares a bit about his background and past and how he came up with the concept behind BizBash. He started BizBash with the vision of creating a vast database of various events and event-related ideas, which other organizers could take a look at and get inspired by and perhaps even further expand upon those ideas. By keeping a track of all the ideas, BizBash not only reduces the manual work that organizers have to do to find out which event did what, but it also helps them come up with new and inspired ideas to increase the fun factor of their events and enhance their value for the attendees.

We are on the verge of a great events industry renaissance
16:46 - 22:00

David and Rachel talk about how face-to-face events are looking to make a comeback with full force after the pandemic. He explains that human gatherings are an essential part of our society; no matter how bad things got during the pandemic, a return to physical gatherings was always inevitable. David emphasizes the importance of event thinking and how it will eventually permeate different types of gatherings, from people returning to the office full-time to camps. Creating temporary, serotonin-increasing moments regularly can help bring people back again and again and make those moments even more special.

Niche events are not going anywhere
22:01 - 27:30

David shares with us that during his research, he discovered that even though some big events companies shut down during and after the pandemic, the niches they worked in didn’t! So instead of targeting multiple niches simultaneously, events companies with expertise in a specific niche are popping up to fill the gaps left by their bigger ancestors.

We are about to see the rebirth of cities
27:31 - 31:34

David explains that since remote work has now become the preferred way of working for most people and companies, cities are going to change. Instead of permanent places of work, offices will become more of gathering places and hubs for socializing, learning, and entertainment. He further tells us that rural areas will see a big jump in the number of events in the coming years. Niche events will thrive in rural settings, and even bigger events like tradeshows will shift to rural locations.

We are living in the age of collaboration artists
31:35 - 33:39

David and Rachel discuss how facilitators who know how to communicate with the end-users will be vital for event organizers and companies in the coming years. According to David, event organizers must become collaboration artists to build a sense of community around their events.

Virtual events platforms are poised to be one of the most powerful ways to solve problems
33:40 - 39:50

David talks about how in the hands of the right collaboration artists, a virtual platform like Hubilo can be a tool for great change. By equipping the right people with the right set of virtual tools, we can not only minimize the entry barrier for a lot of people but hold larger events that are not constricted by geographical barriers.

Transcript

TOPIC: Podcast Interviews - Where Are... 00:00:00-00:04:29

SUBTOPIC: Where Are You Now? 00:00:00-00:00:56

David Adler:  Where are you? Actually?

Rachel Moore:   I'm located in Denver, whereabouts are you?

David Adler:  I'm in Washington, D. C.

Rachel Moore:  Nice. I like Washington, I have  friends there, I have friends  there,

David Adler:  just moved from new york  City after 35

Rachel Moore:  years. Whoa, is that a big  shock to the system?

David Adler:  No, I grew up here,  so it's it's  kind of nice to be away from  the new york, frankly,

Rachel Moore:  I've never been to new york. Um I want to go,  but my daughter is  probably gonna go before me,  She uh I think for the the kids 16th  Birthdays, their grandparents take them on a trip anywhere in the Great 48 they want to go. And um she picked New York City and now I'm  jealous because  I'm not going to new

David Adler:  york, so what's your  background? And what brings you to Hubilo?

Rachel Moore:  Oh sure.

SUBTOPIC: Where Are You Now? 00:00:00-00:00:56

David Adler:  Where are you? Actually?

Rachel Moore:   I'm located in Denver, whereabouts are you?

David Adler:  I'm in Washington, D. C.

Rachel Moore:  Nice. I like Washington, I have  friends there, I have friends  there,

David Adler:  just moved from new york  City after 35

Rachel Moore:  years. Whoa, is that a big  shock to the system?

David Adler:  No, I grew up here,  so it's it's  kind of nice to be away from  the new york, frankly,

Rachel Moore:  I've never been to new york. Um I want to go,  but my daughter is  probably gonna go before me,  She uh I think for the the kids 16th  Birthdays, their grandparents take them on a trip anywhere in the Great 48 they want to go. And um she picked New York City and now I'm  jealous because  I'm not going to new

David Adler:  york, so what's your  background? And what brings you to Hubilo?

Rachel Moore:  Oh sure.

SUBTOPIC: Podcast Interviews - What's Next? 00:00:56-00:04:29

Rachel Moore:  Um But I also do live streaming, I hosted  a livestream show for  them. Um  And I I've done podcasting and stuff like that, so  she we both went went on to  other other  job moves and she  accepted a position  with you below.  And it was  funny because I went to her  house and we were just uh it was her last day at our former company and she just was like  telling me what she was doing. And I was like, oh my gosh, well if you ever need somebody, she's just like, really? And I was like, oh I don't know because I was happy at another role. I was doing content marketing and  we just got talking and here we are. So now I'm  managing the social media, also doing our live streaming and podcasting and we're going to reboot our podcast. They had go uh huh below had going last  winter I think. So you are my first full podcast interview for that reboot. Do you feel awesome?

David Adler:  You know  and how what's going to be the reach of it?

Rachel Moore:  Um  well we'll see because I I think the I think they got it going, but it didn't have a whole lot of push and I don't know if they were really promoting it a whole lot. I am going to promote the current out of this thing and really well and I really want to a I'm a huge believer in podcasts um  you know, I just  know their power and just organic reach of them and that's something we really believe in it. Who below we know that there's community.  I mean I'm sure I'm preaching the choir here because you know, but um we we just want to, we want to showcase these voices but also provide a resource  and  podcast is a great way to do that. Plus um  recording this. We'll get it up as um podcast  episodes. But I'm also  going to be editing some of the video segments. This is why we're both on video so that  we can also push this out  on our live stream. But all with the goal of saying, hey, if you want to hear the in depth interview, go listen to our podcast. So

David Adler:  are you using, I'm  using the greatest  editing tool ever.  Tell me the script.

Rachel Moore:  No,

David Adler:  write it down. D E S C  R I P T changed my life. Like you wouldn't believe it basically allows you to edit podcasts and video  using the word  processing.

Rachel Moore:  No.

David Adler:  Yeah. So basically  what you do is you upload the entire audio  thing that you recorded  and it  enables you to get rid of the arms and the odds in a minute and a  half, 30 seconds  or 10 seconds. It gets  you to to um, you can,  you can edit, you can  just cut out a word and it and it does the cutting video and audio. I'm totally going to look that up. It  is life

Rachel Moore:  changing. I use um I, I did some podcasting with a friend of mine, a colleague or appear  in the social media  and he uh  got me uh  mm hmm. It's the name of the big, it's a terrible name because it's the name of the big blimp that blew up in the fire of the hindenburg. It's called hindenburg. But for a podcast editing, it's fabulous! Because it is the same kind of thing where you can drop it in and automatically  adjusts all the,  all the audio peaks and things like that. But  I like that. I've used adobe audition before and I do have like, I used adobe premiere, I can do  all that stuff. But

David Adler:  man, these days when you could go faster, this is a life changer, I want my life changed. This is this is a  life changer. It is definitely life changing. I use it for everything.  And also you can create these 30  second little audio  clips you can use for social media on  instagram and  everything else.


TOPIC: Podcast Reboot 00:00:00-00:04:46

SUBTOPIC: Where Are You Now? 00:00:00-00:00:56

David Adler:  Where are you? Actually?

Rachel Moore:   I'm located in Denver, whereabouts are you?

David Adler:  I'm in Washington, D. C.

Rachel Moore:  Nice. I like Washington, I have  friends there, I have friends  there,

David Adler:  just moved from new york  City after 35

Rachel Moore:  years. Whoa, is that a big  shock to the system?

David Adler:  No, I grew up here,  so it's it's  kind of nice to be away from  the new york, frankly,

Rachel Moore:  I've never been to new york. Um I want to go,  but my daughter is  probably gonna go before me,  She uh I think for the the kids 16th  Birthdays, their grandparents take them on a trip anywhere in the Great 48 they want to go. And um she picked New York City and now I'm  jealous because  I'm not going to new

David Adler:  york, so what's your  background? And what brings you to Hubilo?

Rachel Moore:  Oh sure.

SUBTOPIC: Where Are You Now? 00:00:00-00:00:56

David Adler:  Where are you? Actually?

Rachel Moore:   I'm located in Denver, whereabouts are you?

David Adler:  I'm in Washington, D. C.

Rachel Moore:  Nice. I like Washington, I have  friends there, I have friends  there,

David Adler:  just moved from new york  City after 35

Rachel Moore:  years. Whoa, is that a big  shock to the system?

David Adler:  No, I grew up here,  so it's it's  kind of nice to be away from  the new york, frankly,

Rachel Moore:  I've never been to new york. Um I want to go,  but my daughter is  probably gonna go before me,  She uh I think for the the kids 16th  Birthdays, their grandparents take them on a trip anywhere in the Great 48 they want to go. And um she picked New York City and now I'm  jealous because  I'm not going to new

David Adler:  york, so what's your  background? And what brings you to Hubilo?

Rachel Moore:  Oh sure.

SUBTOPIC: Podcast Reboot 00:00:56-00:04:46

Rachel Moore:  Um But I also do live streaming, I hosted  a livestream show for  them. Um  And I I've done podcasting and stuff like that, so  she we both went went on to  other other  job moves and she  accepted a position  with you below.  And it was  funny because I went to her  house and we were just uh it was her last day at our former company and she just was like  telling me what she was doing. And I was like, oh my gosh, well if you ever need somebody, she's just like, really? And I was like, oh I don't know because I was happy at another role. I was doing content marketing and  we just got talking and here we are. So now I'm  managing the social media, also doing our live streaming and podcasting and we're going to reboot our podcast. They had go uh huh below had going last  winter I think. So you are my first full podcast interview for that reboot. Do you feel awesome?

David Adler:  You know  and how what's going to be the reach of it?

Rachel Moore:  Um  well we'll see because I I think the I think they got it going, but it didn't have a whole lot of push and I don't know if they were really promoting it a whole lot. I am going to promote the current out of this thing and really well and I really want to a I'm a huge believer in podcasts um  you know, I just  know their power and just organic reach of them and that's something we really believe in it. Who below we know that there's community.  I mean I'm sure I'm preaching the choir here because you know, but um we we just want to, we want to showcase these voices but also provide a resource  and  podcast is a great way to do that. Plus um  recording this. We'll get it up as um podcast  episodes. But I'm also  going to be editing some of the video segments. This is why we're both on video so that  we can also push this out  on our live stream. But all with the goal of saying, hey, if you want to hear the in depth interview, go listen to our podcast. So

David Adler:  are you using, I'm  using the greatest  editing tool ever.  Tell me the script.

Rachel Moore:  No,

David Adler:  write it down. D E S C  R I P T changed my life. Like you wouldn't believe it basically allows you to edit podcasts and video  using the word  processing.

Rachel Moore:  No.

David Adler:  Yeah. So basically  what you do is you upload the entire audio  thing that you recorded  and it  enables you to get rid of the arms and the odds in a minute and a  half, 30 seconds  or 10 seconds. It gets  you to to um, you can,  you can edit, you can  just cut out a word and it and it does the cutting video and audio. I'm totally going to look that up. It  is life

Rachel Moore:  changing. I use um I, I did some podcasting with a friend of mine, a colleague or appear  in the social media  and he uh  got me uh  mm hmm. It's the name of the big, it's a terrible name because it's the name of the big blimp that blew up in the fire of the hindenburg. It's called hindenburg. But for a podcast editing, it's fabulous! Because it is the same kind of thing where you can drop it in and automatically  adjusts all the,  all the audio peaks and things like that. But  I like that. I've used adobe audition before and I do have like, I used adobe premiere, I can do  all that stuff. But

David Adler:  man, these days when you could go faster, this is a life changer, I want my life changed. This is this is a  life changer. It is definitely life changing. I use it for everything.  And also you can create these 30  second little audio  clips you can use for social media on  instagram and  everything else.

Rachel Moore:  I'm totally going to be asking legal for some budget for this.  

David Adler:  Yeah, it's not expensive either. It's like, it's like nothing. That's nothing.  

Rachel Moore:  Oh my gosh. Anything that helps me work smarter instead of  harder. I'm a big fan

SUBTOPIC: Podcast Interviews - What's Next? 00:00:56-00:04:29

Rachel Moore:  Um But I also do live streaming, I hosted  a livestream show for  them. Um  And I I've done podcasting and stuff like that, so  she we both went went on to  other other  job moves and she  accepted a position  with you below.  And it was  funny because I went to her  house and we were just uh it was her last day at our former company and she just was like  telling me what she was doing. And I was like, oh my gosh, well if you ever need somebody, she's just like, really? And I was like, oh I don't know because I was happy at another role. I was doing content marketing and  we just got talking and here we are. So now I'm  managing the social media, also doing our live streaming and podcasting and we're going to reboot our podcast. They had go uh huh below had going last  winter I think. So you are my first full podcast interview for that reboot. Do you feel awesome?

David Adler:  You know  and how what's going to be the reach of it?

Rachel Moore:  Um  well we'll see because I I think the I think they got it going, but it didn't have a whole lot of push and I don't know if they were really promoting it a whole lot. I am going to promote the current out of this thing and really well and I really want to a I'm a huge believer in podcasts um  you know, I just  know their power and just organic reach of them and that's something we really believe in it. Who below we know that there's community.  I mean I'm sure I'm preaching the choir here because you know, but um we we just want to, we want to showcase these voices but also provide a resource  and  podcast is a great way to do that. Plus um  recording this. We'll get it up as um podcast  episodes. But I'm also  going to be editing some of the video segments. This is why we're both on video so that  we can also push this out  on our live stream. But all with the goal of saying, hey, if you want to hear the in depth interview, go listen to our podcast. So

David Adler:  are you using, I'm  using the greatest  editing tool ever.  Tell me the script.

Rachel Moore:  No,

David Adler:  write it down. D E S C  R I P T changed my life. Like you wouldn't believe it basically allows you to edit podcasts and video  using the word  processing.

Rachel Moore:  No.

David Adler:  Yeah. So basically  what you do is you upload the entire audio  thing that you recorded  and it  enables you to get rid of the arms and the odds in a minute and a  half, 30 seconds  or 10 seconds. It gets  you to to um, you can,  you can edit, you can  just cut out a word and it and it does the cutting video and audio. I'm totally going to look that up. It  is life

Rachel Moore:  changing. I use um I, I did some podcasting with a friend of mine, a colleague or appear  in the social media  and he uh  got me uh  mm hmm. It's the name of the big, it's a terrible name because it's the name of the big blimp that blew up in the fire of the hindenburg. It's called hindenburg. But for a podcast editing, it's fabulous! Because it is the same kind of thing where you can drop it in and automatically  adjusts all the,  all the audio peaks and things like that. But  I like that. I've used adobe audition before and I do have like, I used adobe premiere, I can do  all that stuff. But

David Adler:  man, these days when you could go faster, this is a life changer, I want my life changed. This is this is a  life changer. It is definitely life changing. I use it for everything.  And also you can create these 30  second little audio  clips you can use for social media on  instagram and  everything else.


TOPIC: The Great Event Industry Renaissance... 00:04:30-00:11:17

SUBTOPIC: I'm Using It For Everything 00:04:30-00:04:46

Rachel Moore:  I'm totally going to be asking legal for some budget for this.  

David Adler:  Yeah, it's not expensive either. It's like, it's like nothing. That's nothing.  

Rachel Moore:  Oh my gosh. Anything that helps me work smarter instead of  harder. I'm a big fan

SUBTOPIC: The Great Event Industry Renaissance 00:04:46-00:08:32

Rachel Moore:  That's great when you can do that with video and audio editing. That's a big deal.

David Adler:  That

Rachel Moore:  stuff takes so much time.  Well, cool. Um shall we um shall we get started?  

David Adler:  And what do you want, what do you want to do as the topics? I have a, I've  just been,  I just wrote a new paper that I'm working on  called.  It's  coming the great event industry renaissance. Oh, I like that. Really kind of interesting and so I've got a whole bunch of points  that well,

Rachel Moore:  let's um let's do that because when we as we kind of get going here and I will do like a little snaps just so I know the audio start of it, but I'll ask you some kind of intro questions that are really just a little bit more to get, get a little,  get to  know a little bit more about you, but I will say go and say, so, you know,  David, we were getting together here today to talk about kind of the state of the events industry, but I know you have some specific things in  mind and I'd love to hear kind  of what you're working on right now related to  like what you're seeing,  and then if you want to usher into the renaissance saying, and we will just talk about  it from there if that works  alright, so  I will just do this little lovely snap  okay,  and that is kicking off our things.  So, um again, I will edit this all over the place, but um  hey  everyone Rachel with you below  and I'm happy to be joined here today with our guest David Adler from biz bash  now, I can say your  name, David and your business name and you're all that stuff, but I think there's so much more to  you  and um if you don't mind  introduce yourself a little bit, but then I want to ask you some  questions about yourself, but can you introduce yourself to our, our listening and follower  audience?

David Adler:  Absolutely. So I am as you did, you got that right? David Adler, that was the name I was born with no stage

Rachel Moore:  name. We want to know about those

David Adler:  two. Yeah, and I don't have any of those. Um, but I think now, you know, when you do have a name of a person,  you have to think of what  the U. R. L. Of that person will be.  That's right. It's really hard  to like name somebody like john smith or Rachel  more  or it's a hard  U. R. L. Because you're never  going to like  that changed a little.  So, and I don't know if that will happen anymore, but that, that at least in the, in the,  The 2000 this century, we're worrying about that little stuff. So I basically have been the, the ceo  of a company called is  Bash for the last 20 years. We have celebrated our anniversary  started  Right before 9 11.  We went through the dot bomb, we went through uh the  recession,  we went through  all the different  things that you could possibly go doing  Businessly in the last 20 years was like being an outward  bound for the business world,  It was one  big survival  test.  Um, but but what we  do advise bashes,  we cover events  and created a database of who did what at the event.  So that event planners are able to peek  over the fence to see what other  people are doing because for  years you can never see what another event organizer was doing.  And as  event organizing more and more and more important, it became more important than ever to make sure that you're upping the  bar so that you don't, you know what your competition is about.  So we  basically created a  physical visual  vehicle for people to  see ideas  and to get ideas and  to expand on ideas and to find out who  did this stuff.  And it it's  been fantastic over  The last 20 years and now  people are doing that now in the  digital world too because everyone wants to know how did you do that?  You know, we just had a discussion  on on  new technology  that we were for

Rachel Moore:  editing which you know we're geeked out. That's right, that's right. No there's so much to geek out about and it's kind of wild that you're keeping track of all of that. And my mind's a little blown by how much work that must take. It

SUBTOPIC: The Great Event Industry Renaissance 00:04:46-00:07:03

Rachel Moore:  That's great when you can do that with video and audio editing. That's a big deal.

David Adler:  That

Rachel Moore:  stuff takes so much time.  Well, cool. Um shall we um shall we get started?  

David Adler:  And what do you want, what do you want to do as the topics? I have a, I've  just been,  I just wrote a new paper that I'm working on  called.  It's  coming the great event industry renaissance. Oh, I like that. Really kind of interesting and so I've got a whole bunch of points  that well,

Rachel Moore:  let's um let's do that because when we as we kind of get going here and I will do like a little snaps just so I know the audio start of it, but I'll ask you some kind of intro questions that are really just a little bit more to get, get a little,  get to  know a little bit more about you, but I will say go and say, so, you know,  David, we were getting together here today to talk about kind of the state of the events industry, but I know you have some specific things in  mind and I'd love to hear kind  of what you're working on right now related to  like what you're seeing,  and then if you want to usher into the renaissance saying, and we will just talk about  it from there if that works  alright, so  I will just do this little lovely snap  okay,  and that is kicking off our things.  So, um again, I will edit this all over the place, but um  hey  everyone Rachel with you below  and I'm happy to be joined here today with our guest David Adler from biz bash  now, I can say your  name, David and your business name and you're all that stuff, but I think there's so much more to  you  and um if you don't mind  introduce yourself a little bit, but then I want to ask you some  questions about yourself, but can you introduce yourself to our, our listening and follower  audience?

David Adler:  Absolutely. So I am as you did, you got that right? David Adler, that was the name I was born with no stage

Rachel Moore:  name. We want to know about those

David Adler:  two. Yeah, and I don't have any of those. Um, but I think now, you know, when you do have a name of a person,  you have to think of what  the U. R. L. Of that person will be.  That's right. It's really hard  to like name somebody like john smith or Rachel  more  or it's a hard  U. R. L. Because you're never  going to like  that changed a little.  So, and I don't know if that will happen anymore, but that, that at least in the, in the,

SUBTOPIC: BizBash 00:07:03-00:09:55

David Adler:  of a company called is  Bash for the last 20 years. We have celebrated our anniversary  started  Right before 9 11.  We went through the dot bomb, we went through uh the  recession,  we went through  all the different  things that you could possibly go doing  Businessly in the last 20 years was like being an outward  bound for the business world,  It was one  big survival  test.  Um, but but what we  do advise bashes,  we cover events  and created a database of who did what at the event.  So that event planners are able to peek  over the fence to see what other  people are doing because for  years you can never see what another event organizer was doing.  And as  event organizing more and more and more important, it became more important than ever to make sure that you're upping the  bar so that you don't, you know what your competition is about.  So we  basically created a  physical visual  vehicle for people to  see ideas  and to get ideas and  to expand on ideas and to find out who  did this stuff.  And it it's  been fantastic over  The last 20 years and now  people are doing that now in the  digital world too because everyone wants to know how did you do that?  You know, we just had a discussion  on on  new technology  that we were for

Rachel Moore:  editing which you know we're geeked out. That's right, that's right. No there's so much to geek out about and it's kind of wild that you're keeping track of all of that. And my mind's a little blown by how much work that must take. It

David Adler:  takes a lot of work. We've had. We've had, we have a huge staff of people  In December of 2019. I sold 80% of the company to a company called Tarsus  who is continuing that and taking it more global  because they have they're all around the world like Cubillo and it's gonna be a really interesting  ride to see what they're gonna do  because the one thing  about events, it's kind of like  the music business, it  travels internationally.  Everyone is doing the same thing gathering, Human gathering is  not going to be different  uh that  much, you know, fundamentally  in every part  of the world, you know, you're  gonna get together, you're gonna talk,  you're  going to do things  that you may do in your  own world, but it all blends together eventually and you want to make sure that it's uh it's cool  and it's fun and you'll remember it and it's not  boring and you're not wasting your time.  

Rachel Moore:  Oh no, yeah, we were just talking about that too. No one wants to waste their time and you know what I'm kind of, I'm envisioning  your  visiting biz bash is almost  like  if anyone remembers that tim allen show um what was that?  The one where he's like the tim the  tool man taylor  and he had the neighbor  in the backyard that he always  ever just saw his eyes just kind of peek under the fence. So I feel like you're like  this bash is is that guy  peeking over the fence  and everyone right now  listening is yelling that I'm  not, I don't know his name, I think it's Wilson um but yeah, where you just always have that eye on like, okay what's happening in your yard, let me just, I'm just,

David Adler:  you know when you think about it, that's what  journalism

SUBTOPIC: Business Bash 00:08:32-00:09:55

David Adler:  In December of 2019. I sold 80% of the company to a company called Tarsus  who is continuing that and taking it more global  because they have they're all around the world like Cubillo and it's gonna be a really interesting  ride to see what they're gonna do  because the one thing  about events, it's kind of like  the music business, it  travels internationally.  Everyone is doing the same thing gathering, Human gathering is  not going to be different  uh that  much, you know, fundamentally  in every part  of the world, you know, you're  gonna get together, you're gonna talk,  you're  going to do things  that you may do in your  own world, but it all blends together eventually and you want to make sure that it's uh it's cool  and it's fun and you'll remember it and it's not  boring and you're not wasting your time.  

Rachel Moore:  Oh no, yeah, we were just talking about that too. No one wants to waste their time and you know what I'm kind of, I'm envisioning  your  visiting biz bash is almost  like  if anyone remembers that tim allen show um what was that?  The one where he's like the tim the  tool man taylor  and he had the neighbor  in the backyard that he always  ever just saw his eyes just kind of peek under the fence. So I feel like you're like  this bash is is that guy  peeking over the fence  and everyone right now  listening is yelling that I'm  not, I don't know his name, I think it's Wilson um but yeah, where you just always have that eye on like, okay what's happening in your yard, let me just, I'm just,

David Adler:  you know when you think about it, that's what  journalism

SUBTOPIC: Going to an Event 00:09:55-00:11:17

David Adler:  a journalist  but you have a certain  expertise. I think when you, when you get to know a feel really well and you get to see it for years and years and years  and you know, it's, it's just, it's it's been fascinating for me because you know, I started out the first thing I did out of colleges. I'm a startup guy started a society newspaper magazine for Washington D. C.  First month I graduated college, I started a society magazine  and for some reason  it was out  in black tie every  night and people thought I was a maitre  D  because  I was at parties every  night  And I and it was, it was really interesting endeavor. I started it on $6,000. I heard  my mother to be the editor and we would just go to cocktail parties and cover it and create a database of, of who did what in Washington who the power players were.  And then when I was working for a big corporation, I realized that this event industry is kind of,  it's, it's a version of what I  call soft  power. It's  because what you know,  going to an event is a way to do reconnaissance  and to  hear what other people are thinking and to get  the serendipity  effect.  So it's kind of like  going out on a mission in a sense, it's not like war, but it is kind of like war when  you think about it  and, and going to an event is like going into the  front lines  and so it's more important than ever. Everything, you know, events are, are a way that we gather  and see what other people are doing.  

SUBTOPIC: The Event Industry Is Power 00:09:55-00:11:17

David Adler:  a journalist  but you have a certain  expertise. I think when you, when you get to know a feel really well and you get to see it for years and years and years  and you know, it's, it's just, it's it's been fascinating for me because you know, I started out the first thing I did out of colleges. I'm a startup guy started a society newspaper magazine for Washington D. C.  First month I graduated college, I started a society magazine  and for some reason  it was out  in black tie every  night and people thought I was a maitre  D  because  I was at parties every  night  And I and it was, it was really interesting endeavor. I started it on $6,000. I heard  my mother to be the editor and we would just go to cocktail parties and cover it and create a database of, of who did what in Washington who the power players were.  And then when I was working for a big corporation, I realized that this event industry is kind of,  it's, it's a version of what I  call soft  power. It's  because what you know,  going to an event is a way to do reconnaissance  and to  hear what other people are thinking and to get  the serendipity  effect.  So it's kind of like  going out on a mission in a sense, it's not like war, but it is kind of like war when  you think about it  and, and going to an event is like going into the  front lines  and so it's more important than ever. Everything, you know, events are, are a way that we gather  and see what other people are doing.  


TOPIC: Event Industry Renaissance 00:04:46-00:11:17

SUBTOPIC: The Great Event Industry Renaissance 00:04:46-00:08:32

Rachel Moore:  That's great when you can do that with video and audio editing. That's a big deal.

David Adler:  That

Rachel Moore:  stuff takes so much time.  Well, cool. Um shall we um shall we get started?  

David Adler:  And what do you want, what do you want to do as the topics? I have a, I've  just been,  I just wrote a new paper that I'm working on  called.  It's  coming the great event industry renaissance. Oh, I like that. Really kind of interesting and so I've got a whole bunch of points  that well,

Rachel Moore:  let's um let's do that because when we as we kind of get going here and I will do like a little snaps just so I know the audio start of it, but I'll ask you some kind of intro questions that are really just a little bit more to get, get a little,  get to  know a little bit more about you, but I will say go and say, so, you know,  David, we were getting together here today to talk about kind of the state of the events industry, but I know you have some specific things in  mind and I'd love to hear kind  of what you're working on right now related to  like what you're seeing,  and then if you want to usher into the renaissance saying, and we will just talk about  it from there if that works  alright, so  I will just do this little lovely snap  okay,  and that is kicking off our things.  So, um again, I will edit this all over the place, but um  hey  everyone Rachel with you below  and I'm happy to be joined here today with our guest David Adler from biz bash  now, I can say your  name, David and your business name and you're all that stuff, but I think there's so much more to  you  and um if you don't mind  introduce yourself a little bit, but then I want to ask you some  questions about yourself, but can you introduce yourself to our, our listening and follower  audience?

David Adler:  Absolutely. So I am as you did, you got that right? David Adler, that was the name I was born with no stage

Rachel Moore:  name. We want to know about those

David Adler:  two. Yeah, and I don't have any of those. Um, but I think now, you know, when you do have a name of a person,  you have to think of what  the U. R. L. Of that person will be.  That's right. It's really hard  to like name somebody like john smith or Rachel  more  or it's a hard  U. R. L. Because you're never  going to like  that changed a little.  So, and I don't know if that will happen anymore, but that, that at least in the, in the,  The 2000 this century, we're worrying about that little stuff. So I basically have been the, the ceo  of a company called is  Bash for the last 20 years. We have celebrated our anniversary  started  Right before 9 11.  We went through the dot bomb, we went through uh the  recession,  we went through  all the different  things that you could possibly go doing  Businessly in the last 20 years was like being an outward  bound for the business world,  It was one  big survival  test.  Um, but but what we  do advise bashes,  we cover events  and created a database of who did what at the event.  So that event planners are able to peek  over the fence to see what other  people are doing because for  years you can never see what another event organizer was doing.  And as  event organizing more and more and more important, it became more important than ever to make sure that you're upping the  bar so that you don't, you know what your competition is about.  So we  basically created a  physical visual  vehicle for people to  see ideas  and to get ideas and  to expand on ideas and to find out who  did this stuff.  And it it's  been fantastic over  The last 20 years and now  people are doing that now in the  digital world too because everyone wants to know how did you do that?  You know, we just had a discussion  on on  new technology  that we were for

Rachel Moore:  editing which you know we're geeked out. That's right, that's right. No there's so much to geek out about and it's kind of wild that you're keeping track of all of that. And my mind's a little blown by how much work that must take. It

SUBTOPIC: The Great Event Industry Renaissance 00:04:46-00:07:03

Rachel Moore:  That's great when you can do that with video and audio editing. That's a big deal.

David Adler:  That

Rachel Moore:  stuff takes so much time.  Well, cool. Um shall we um shall we get started?  

David Adler:  And what do you want, what do you want to do as the topics? I have a, I've  just been,  I just wrote a new paper that I'm working on  called.  It's  coming the great event industry renaissance. Oh, I like that. Really kind of interesting and so I've got a whole bunch of points  that well,

Rachel Moore:  let's um let's do that because when we as we kind of get going here and I will do like a little snaps just so I know the audio start of it, but I'll ask you some kind of intro questions that are really just a little bit more to get, get a little,  get to  know a little bit more about you, but I will say go and say, so, you know,  David, we were getting together here today to talk about kind of the state of the events industry, but I know you have some specific things in  mind and I'd love to hear kind  of what you're working on right now related to  like what you're seeing,  and then if you want to usher into the renaissance saying, and we will just talk about  it from there if that works  alright, so  I will just do this little lovely snap  okay,  and that is kicking off our things.  So, um again, I will edit this all over the place, but um  hey  everyone Rachel with you below  and I'm happy to be joined here today with our guest David Adler from biz bash  now, I can say your  name, David and your business name and you're all that stuff, but I think there's so much more to  you  and um if you don't mind  introduce yourself a little bit, but then I want to ask you some  questions about yourself, but can you introduce yourself to our, our listening and follower  audience?

David Adler:  Absolutely. So I am as you did, you got that right? David Adler, that was the name I was born with no stage

Rachel Moore:  name. We want to know about those

David Adler:  two. Yeah, and I don't have any of those. Um, but I think now, you know, when you do have a name of a person,  you have to think of what  the U. R. L. Of that person will be.  That's right. It's really hard  to like name somebody like john smith or Rachel  more  or it's a hard  U. R. L. Because you're never  going to like  that changed a little.  So, and I don't know if that will happen anymore, but that, that at least in the, in the,

SUBTOPIC: BizBash 00:07:03-00:09:55

David Adler:  of a company called is  Bash for the last 20 years. We have celebrated our anniversary  started  Right before 9 11.  We went through the dot bomb, we went through uh the  recession,  we went through  all the different  things that you could possibly go doing  Businessly in the last 20 years was like being an outward  bound for the business world,  It was one  big survival  test.  Um, but but what we  do advise bashes,  we cover events  and created a database of who did what at the event.  So that event planners are able to peek  over the fence to see what other  people are doing because for  years you can never see what another event organizer was doing.  And as  event organizing more and more and more important, it became more important than ever to make sure that you're upping the  bar so that you don't, you know what your competition is about.  So we  basically created a  physical visual  vehicle for people to  see ideas  and to get ideas and  to expand on ideas and to find out who  did this stuff.  And it it's  been fantastic over  The last 20 years and now  people are doing that now in the  digital world too because everyone wants to know how did you do that?  You know, we just had a discussion  on on  new technology  that we were for

Rachel Moore:  editing which you know we're geeked out. That's right, that's right. No there's so much to geek out about and it's kind of wild that you're keeping track of all of that. And my mind's a little blown by how much work that must take. It

David Adler:  takes a lot of work. We've had. We've had, we have a huge staff of people  In December of 2019. I sold 80% of the company to a company called Tarsus  who is continuing that and taking it more global  because they have they're all around the world like Cubillo and it's gonna be a really interesting  ride to see what they're gonna do  because the one thing  about events, it's kind of like  the music business, it  travels internationally.  Everyone is doing the same thing gathering, Human gathering is  not going to be different  uh that  much, you know, fundamentally  in every part  of the world, you know, you're  gonna get together, you're gonna talk,  you're  going to do things  that you may do in your  own world, but it all blends together eventually and you want to make sure that it's uh it's cool  and it's fun and you'll remember it and it's not  boring and you're not wasting your time.  

Rachel Moore:  Oh no, yeah, we were just talking about that too. No one wants to waste their time and you know what I'm kind of, I'm envisioning  your  visiting biz bash is almost  like  if anyone remembers that tim allen show um what was that?  The one where he's like the tim the  tool man taylor  and he had the neighbor  in the backyard that he always  ever just saw his eyes just kind of peek under the fence. So I feel like you're like  this bash is is that guy  peeking over the fence  and everyone right now  listening is yelling that I'm  not, I don't know his name, I think it's Wilson um but yeah, where you just always have that eye on like, okay what's happening in your yard, let me just, I'm just,

David Adler:  you know when you think about it, that's what  journalism

SUBTOPIC: Business Bash 00:08:32-00:09:55

David Adler:  In December of 2019. I sold 80% of the company to a company called Tarsus  who is continuing that and taking it more global  because they have they're all around the world like Cubillo and it's gonna be a really interesting  ride to see what they're gonna do  because the one thing  about events, it's kind of like  the music business, it  travels internationally.  Everyone is doing the same thing gathering, Human gathering is  not going to be different  uh that  much, you know, fundamentally  in every part  of the world, you know, you're  gonna get together, you're gonna talk,  you're  going to do things  that you may do in your  own world, but it all blends together eventually and you want to make sure that it's uh it's cool  and it's fun and you'll remember it and it's not  boring and you're not wasting your time.  

Rachel Moore:  Oh no, yeah, we were just talking about that too. No one wants to waste their time and you know what I'm kind of, I'm envisioning  your  visiting biz bash is almost  like  if anyone remembers that tim allen show um what was that?  The one where he's like the tim the  tool man taylor  and he had the neighbor  in the backyard that he always  ever just saw his eyes just kind of peek under the fence. So I feel like you're like  this bash is is that guy  peeking over the fence  and everyone right now  listening is yelling that I'm  not, I don't know his name, I think it's Wilson um but yeah, where you just always have that eye on like, okay what's happening in your yard, let me just, I'm just,

David Adler:  you know when you think about it, that's what  journalism

SUBTOPIC: Going to an Event 00:09:55-00:11:17

David Adler:  a journalist  but you have a certain  expertise. I think when you, when you get to know a feel really well and you get to see it for years and years and years  and you know, it's, it's just, it's it's been fascinating for me because you know, I started out the first thing I did out of colleges. I'm a startup guy started a society newspaper magazine for Washington D. C.  First month I graduated college, I started a society magazine  and for some reason  it was out  in black tie every  night and people thought I was a maitre  D  because  I was at parties every  night  And I and it was, it was really interesting endeavor. I started it on $6,000. I heard  my mother to be the editor and we would just go to cocktail parties and cover it and create a database of, of who did what in Washington who the power players were.  And then when I was working for a big corporation, I realized that this event industry is kind of,  it's, it's a version of what I  call soft  power. It's  because what you know,  going to an event is a way to do reconnaissance  and to  hear what other people are thinking and to get  the serendipity  effect.  So it's kind of like  going out on a mission in a sense, it's not like war, but it is kind of like war when  you think about it  and, and going to an event is like going into the  front lines  and so it's more important than ever. Everything, you know, events are, are a way that we gather  and see what other people are doing.  

SUBTOPIC: The Event Industry Is Power 00:09:55-00:11:17

David Adler:  a journalist  but you have a certain  expertise. I think when you, when you get to know a feel really well and you get to see it for years and years and years  and you know, it's, it's just, it's it's been fascinating for me because you know, I started out the first thing I did out of colleges. I'm a startup guy started a society newspaper magazine for Washington D. C.  First month I graduated college, I started a society magazine  and for some reason  it was out  in black tie every  night and people thought I was a maitre  D  because  I was at parties every  night  And I and it was, it was really interesting endeavor. I started it on $6,000. I heard  my mother to be the editor and we would just go to cocktail parties and cover it and create a database of, of who did what in Washington who the power players were.  And then when I was working for a big corporation, I realized that this event industry is kind of,  it's, it's a version of what I  call soft  power. It's  because what you know,  going to an event is a way to do reconnaissance  and to  hear what other people are thinking and to get  the serendipity  effect.  So it's kind of like  going out on a mission in a sense, it's not like war, but it is kind of like war when  you think about it  and, and going to an event is like going into the  front lines  and so it's more important than ever. Everything, you know, events are, are a way that we gather  and see what other people are doing.  


TOPIC: The Event Space 00:11:18-00:35:46

SUBTOPIC: Gosh, I Love That You're Talking About This 00:11:18-00:14:27

Rachel Moore:  Well, such a, it's such an interesting, um, you  know, exercise in human  psychology to, I mean, gosh, and, and again, I love that you're talking about this too because I don't, I don't have time, I don't have time to go to every event and go judge it. I mean if  I was getting paid as a journalist to say, hey, I want you  to go to literally every event you can  and then right on that stuff, you know, just the takeaways, what you saw. Sure, and that's what you're basically  doing and, and  that's so that's so valuable because yes, all of us, we're not at war, but we definitely are in a very strong competition to put on the best event out there and heck yeah, if I could learn from what somebody else did and said, hey, that worked over there,

David Adler:  The event, I think you have to think of the event  spaces the battle  and you're taking and you're gonna get  one company, you're gonna meet people from  another company and you're gonna see what they are doing  and hear about their  little secrets and then go back and say, hey boss, hey, guess what I heard last night at this event  because it's  the only way to really do  it legitimately,  yeah, you can go online, but that's, you know, that's just  another way of doing it.  Primary research  in a sense when you think about  it and you think about it. But you know, the  word gossip is also  that two people want to know like, what are these guys doing and what are they wearing? And  like, you know,  that's a nice new ring  that woman got, maybe  she's engaged. You  know, that's, that's right. Well,

Rachel Moore:  and let's, let's not kid ourselves, everybody's talking about that  stuff still to, I mean,  I, I've been on stage at a, at a couple of, you know, our events that we host to with you below. And  you know, I do put a lot of thought, I'm like,  okay, I gotta make sure because I'm sure somebody's gonna have an opinion about my makeup or about my hair, about like jewelry. I mean, all that's still inter playing.  They're mixed in with the rest of everything you're experiencing at  an event. And so, but  I love that,  forget  it. There's, there's a database. So  as somebody  who's really interested in the  tracking of information  and knowing that it's  happening and, you know, having  mixed feelings about how much is getting  tracked and how much isn't knowing that this is happening for the events industry  is  fascinating to me and of course, you know, I want all the  information. So I'm glad that you're  here with us today to talk about  that,

David Adler:  you know, it's so funny, we  grew to being the largest website for event organizers  To get the style side of the business rather than, you know, if anybody can figure out, you know how much alcohol it takes to get like 300 people drunk off  their assets, but you  know, to make it, you know, memorable  forever.  It's you know, that they have hired this event designer and they did  that and like, do you remember, I mean  sometimes it's so funny,  even  on the personal wedding  side, people will talk about their personal events for the for the, that they have  A wedding and 50 years  later they're saying, oh my God, you remember that, what we did it, my wedding,  it's  great sculpture and they did this, blah, blah, blah  people. It's  it's it's a way of engaging people that that  doesn't happen  in other types of things.

Rachel Moore:  I love that you said that too, because it is, I mean,  it gets  back to that experience of  things where sure, I  mean, and I  even think about how people spend money nowadays,  like you could buy  things you do, you want to buy experiences  and if people are  investing their time and money into going to an experience and  you send them  away where they're going to be talking  about it, whether  It's next week, next month, next year, five  years from now or beyond

SUBTOPIC: Event Space Battlefield 00:11:18-00:14:27

Rachel Moore:  Well, such a, it's such an interesting, um, you  know, exercise in human  psychology to, I mean, gosh, and, and again, I love that you're talking about this too because I don't, I don't have time, I don't have time to go to every event and go judge it. I mean if  I was getting paid as a journalist to say, hey, I want you  to go to literally every event you can  and then right on that stuff, you know, just the takeaways, what you saw. Sure, and that's what you're basically  doing and, and  that's so that's so valuable because yes, all of us, we're not at war, but we definitely are in a very strong competition to put on the best event out there and heck yeah, if I could learn from what somebody else did and said, hey, that worked over there,

David Adler:  The event, I think you have to think of the event  spaces the battle  and you're taking and you're gonna get  one company, you're gonna meet people from  another company and you're gonna see what they are doing  and hear about their  little secrets and then go back and say, hey boss, hey, guess what I heard last night at this event  because it's  the only way to really do  it legitimately,  yeah, you can go online, but that's, you know, that's just  another way of doing it.  Primary research  in a sense when you think about  it and you think about it. But you know, the  word gossip is also  that two people want to know like, what are these guys doing and what are they wearing? And  like, you know,  that's a nice new ring  that woman got, maybe  she's engaged. You  know, that's, that's right. Well,

Rachel Moore:  and let's, let's not kid ourselves, everybody's talking about that  stuff still to, I mean,  I, I've been on stage at a, at a couple of, you know, our events that we host to with you below. And  you know, I do put a lot of thought, I'm like,  okay, I gotta make sure because I'm sure somebody's gonna have an opinion about my makeup or about my hair, about like jewelry. I mean, all that's still inter playing.  They're mixed in with the rest of everything you're experiencing at  an event. And so, but  I love that,  forget  it. There's, there's a database. So  as somebody  who's really interested in the  tracking of information  and knowing that it's  happening and, you know, having  mixed feelings about how much is getting  tracked and how much isn't knowing that this is happening for the events industry  is  fascinating to me and of course, you know, I want all the  information. So I'm glad that you're  here with us today to talk about  that,

David Adler:  you know, it's so funny, we  grew to being the largest website for event organizers  To get the style side of the business rather than, you know, if anybody can figure out, you know how much alcohol it takes to get like 300 people drunk off  their assets, but you  know, to make it, you know, memorable  forever.  It's you know, that they have hired this event designer and they did  that and like, do you remember, I mean  sometimes it's so funny,  even  on the personal wedding  side, people will talk about their personal events for the for the, that they have  A wedding and 50 years  later they're saying, oh my God, you remember that, what we did it, my wedding,  it's  great sculpture and they did this, blah, blah, blah  people. It's  it's it's a way of engaging people that that  doesn't happen  in other types of things.

Rachel Moore:  I love that you said that too, because it is, I mean,  it gets  back to that experience of  things where sure, I  mean, and I  even think about how people spend money nowadays,  like you could buy  things you do, you want to buy experiences  and if people are  investing their time and money into going to an experience and  you send them  away where they're going to be talking  about it, whether  It's next week, next month, next year, five  years from now or beyond

SUBTOPIC: How to Create Intimacy at Events 00:14:27-00:20:11

Rachel Moore:  that lasting experience, because people, as you  mentioned, they're going to talk  about it and that means you're going to get, be able to succeed more and more of your events. But I love that you  bring that whole,  it is just  like a wedding where I think all  of us would love to put on events that are like those epic weddings that  nobody will, nobody will

David Adler:  forget. So the one thing that I always, whenever I speak on events, I always bring it back to  the best event  organizers I know are  The directors that did summer camps in the 70s and 60's  And I don't even the 80s and 90s, and but if you have a summer camp experience, you know what I'm thinking about, you know, that there's something that they do on a regular basis that makes you  want to come back and  sometimes these high powered conferences are nothing more than reinventing summer camp. There were some of them are horrible,  but the idea is  that you want that feeling that, you know, you're gonna sing that song and you're gonna get goose bumps, you  know? Yes,  so, so, so the idea is to how do you create intimacy at events and and make them feel, you know, basically people are selling you know memories in many cases  remember and also  when you remember that sticks  and then you make buying decisions and you make  relationship decisions  and you make creation  decisions  and you if there's something about it that that you can see it on their face, there's an  oxytocin  exchange  that happens in events that usually it's the chemical between moms and kids, but it really happens everywhere. There's also when you think about events, you think about  the social physics  of how ideas flow  because ideas flow in ways almost only the virus is working.  You know, when you think about  it like people are they're having these viruses and uh, and you see how, you know,  ideas  flow in the same way. That's what I  learned recently. That when you think  about it, if you can control  it and do it in a good way,  then you can really make things  happen and how quickly things are happening.  Yeah, that's right.

Rachel Moore:  Well, and so this kind  of takes us into  two and I I do have some  personal questions to ask you toward the end because I of course  want to have everybody know more about you and we're learning so much already, but we'll  we'll get into it too. But  you're talking about a lot of, you know, I think experience can be a central  theme we're talking about here  too, and memories and  but just um  not just I I just feel like so many people, especially  if they don't work in the events  industry, don't really think about  events, as you mentioned, that there  there's there's psychology,  there's chemical exchange is happening there, where you're actually impacting how someone thinks and feels, and I think  that's probably segways  nicely. I know you're working on some stuff right now that  probably  translate right into  there, so tell us what you're working  on right now,  as far as far as  events right now are  looking and what your perspective is on them.

David Adler:  It occurred to me that we're at an inflection point in the event industry,  but I think what  we're seeing, you know, we've been through this awful down slide  where people all of a sudden appreciate events  because they have not been able to go to them,  and you're seeing the rise of the of the of the of the digital platform, you're seeing all these things are trying  to emulate  the face to face event.  And I see what's happening though now, after 20 months or whatever number of months we're doing in this.  that we're in the, on the  verge of a great event industry renaissance that I think from the point of view of,  you know, we've hit the bottom, but  in every sort of downturn and every type of crisis comes opportunity,  and and you're gonna, you're seeing that now, and I was  trying to go through  where I see that  happening. And  and what I  Have found that one  thing that, that people really need to know is that there is a need for human gathering, we teach, we learn, we socialize all that kind of stuff. And so I think that that not only is it going to be  a gold mine  that's going to happen,  but it's  also going to be a  major way to think.  And  so the first thing that I'm finding is that event thinking is going to permeate  everything from just managing  the act of employees,  going to work to managing  a senior, a senior center  in a sense, it's about this temporary  moment that  that happened,  that  events are about the temporary  moment. You never want to  decorate your  house, like you're, you're having a party because you wouldn't get  sick of having all that, those balloons  around and so you went like nice solid marble and things like that. But when you do a temporary event  thinking  it's, it transports you for the moment.  And  so even when people are coming back to the office now, event  organizers are using that as a way to,  to encourage people to come back and to celebrate that they're coming back.  And and I see that that, that's a whole area of thinking and  methodology,  remote work is changing everything  and this, it's  creating a whole new sort of type of events. My mother was in a,  a memory  unit for Alzheimer's, which was awful, but it was fun  interesting to see the  camp directors  at the Alzheimer Clinic trying to get everybody to do stuff because they hold the day, you know,  they, and so  event organizers are really like  Camp counselors in one in  one sense and  then thinking is going to become more and more important  and you know, and  everything is going to get  involved in that and you're gonna see more  catering will get  involved in those kinds of things and gifting and experiential agencies to make  it so that when people  come back, they remember,  oh  my God, this is the first day, back  in every quarter, we're going to do something I

Rachel Moore:  love, oh my gosh, you are just  speaking music to my ears right now because I do feel like  everyone kind of just wants everything to go back

SUBTOPIC: How to Create Intimacy at Events 00:14:27-00:20:11

Rachel Moore:  that lasting experience, because people, as you  mentioned, they're going to talk  about it and that means you're going to get, be able to succeed more and more of your events. But I love that you  bring that whole,  it is just  like a wedding where I think all  of us would love to put on events that are like those epic weddings that  nobody will, nobody will

David Adler:  forget. So the one thing that I always, whenever I speak on events, I always bring it back to  the best event  organizers I know are  The directors that did summer camps in the 70s and 60's  And I don't even the 80s and 90s, and but if you have a summer camp experience, you know what I'm thinking about, you know, that there's something that they do on a regular basis that makes you  want to come back and  sometimes these high powered conferences are nothing more than reinventing summer camp. There were some of them are horrible,  but the idea is  that you want that feeling that, you know, you're gonna sing that song and you're gonna get goose bumps, you  know? Yes,  so, so, so the idea is to how do you create intimacy at events and and make them feel, you know, basically people are selling you know memories in many cases  remember and also  when you remember that sticks  and then you make buying decisions and you make  relationship decisions  and you make creation  decisions  and you if there's something about it that that you can see it on their face, there's an  oxytocin  exchange  that happens in events that usually it's the chemical between moms and kids, but it really happens everywhere. There's also when you think about events, you think about  the social physics  of how ideas flow  because ideas flow in ways almost only the virus is working.  You know, when you think about  it like people are they're having these viruses and uh, and you see how, you know,  ideas  flow in the same way. That's what I  learned recently. That when you think  about it, if you can control  it and do it in a good way,  then you can really make things  happen and how quickly things are happening.  Yeah, that's right.

Rachel Moore:  Well, and so this kind  of takes us into  two and I I do have some  personal questions to ask you toward the end because I of course  want to have everybody know more about you and we're learning so much already, but we'll  we'll get into it too. But  you're talking about a lot of, you know, I think experience can be a central  theme we're talking about here  too, and memories and  but just um  not just I I just feel like so many people, especially  if they don't work in the events  industry, don't really think about  events, as you mentioned, that there  there's there's psychology,  there's chemical exchange is happening there, where you're actually impacting how someone thinks and feels, and I think  that's probably segways  nicely. I know you're working on some stuff right now that  probably  translate right into  there, so tell us what you're working  on right now,  as far as far as  events right now are  looking and what your perspective is on them.

David Adler:  It occurred to me that we're at an inflection point in the event industry,  but I think what  we're seeing, you know, we've been through this awful down slide  where people all of a sudden appreciate events  because they have not been able to go to them,  and you're seeing the rise of the of the of the of the digital platform, you're seeing all these things are trying  to emulate  the face to face event.  And I see what's happening though now, after 20 months or whatever number of months we're doing in this.  that we're in the, on the  verge of a great event industry renaissance that I think from the point of view of,  you know, we've hit the bottom, but  in every sort of downturn and every type of crisis comes opportunity,  and and you're gonna, you're seeing that now, and I was  trying to go through  where I see that  happening. And  and what I  Have found that one  thing that, that people really need to know is that there is a need for human gathering, we teach, we learn, we socialize all that kind of stuff. And so I think that that not only is it going to be  a gold mine  that's going to happen,  but it's  also going to be a  major way to think.  And  so the first thing that I'm finding is that event thinking is going to permeate  everything from just managing  the act of employees,  going to work to managing  a senior, a senior center  in a sense, it's about this temporary  moment that  that happened,  that  events are about the temporary  moment. You never want to  decorate your  house, like you're, you're having a party because you wouldn't get  sick of having all that, those balloons  around and so you went like nice solid marble and things like that. But when you do a temporary event  thinking  it's, it transports you for the moment.  And  so even when people are coming back to the office now, event  organizers are using that as a way to,  to encourage people to come back and to celebrate that they're coming back.  And and I see that that, that's a whole area of thinking and  methodology,  remote work is changing everything  and this, it's  creating a whole new sort of type of events. My mother was in a,  a memory  unit for Alzheimer's, which was awful, but it was fun  interesting to see the  camp directors  at the Alzheimer Clinic trying to get everybody to do stuff because they hold the day, you know,  they, and so  event organizers are really like  Camp counselors in one in  one sense and  then thinking is going to become more and more important  and you know, and  everything is going to get  involved in that and you're gonna see more  catering will get  involved in those kinds of things and gifting and experiential agencies to make  it so that when people  come back, they remember,  oh  my God, this is the first day, back  in every quarter, we're going to do something I

Rachel Moore:  love, oh my gosh, you are just  speaking music to my ears right now because I do feel like  everyone kind of just wants everything to go back

SUBTOPIC: The First Day of School 00:20:11-00:24:09

Rachel Moore:  to normal. Like, okay, if  we tell you yes, you're going to come  back to the office. Um,  they don't treat  it like the first day of school to me, I  always think back to like when  and you know, again, we're kind of in that season right now,  a lot of kids did just go back to school with  all the ins and outs that,  that is happening  right now with the  pandemic going on and everything.  But um, first  day of school is always just  like the super high, you know, like you said, there's serotonin going on, it's like, okay, I'm gonna go see  some friends I haven't seen for  a while, it feels special. It doesn't feel like just any  other day I'm going  in  and I  think that's where so  many people miss the opportunity to not make that a  regular thing, should  not turn that into,  uh, you know,  let's, let's capitalize on that feeling more  often than just like, say once a year  or, you know, making it just about a certain day, but,  but like you said, they're  welcoming people back, why  not make that,  you know,  use the games, use the food  because God knows that  food can speak to anybody just about. But you know, just add that little  bit of special Sprinkle  to it. That makes it feel like, hey, I am in a cool  event, not just an everyday  kind of thing that I can't get excited about

David Adler:  totally, but you can imagine  the doubt that, you know, you have these big expectations, you're going to the office for the first time  and you get  there and nothing's happening  if you,  it's like a downer. So  smart  business companies are, are definitely doing  exactly what you said is  capitalizing on that and event organizers are now managing that process and they're turning those  remote working  because people are gonna do more and  more remote working into when  they do come to the office and get together on a regular basis  into event thinking and it makes it more fun and it also makes it better for the company and you sell more  stuff and you, and it's more  effective.

Rachel Moore:  Such a good point to,  and, and especially  thinking there are a lot  of companies that are  not necessarily gonna go back to the office, they're going to continue to be primarily remote,  at least for the foreseeable  future.  But you talk about that first day for a  fully remote employee, that's a big  challenge. You don't have the big  geographical physical  location to make some big splash. You've  gotta do it virtually.  And so man, I can see a lot of them probably wanted.

David Adler:  Yeah, there's a lot  of, you know, using digital tools  and face to face  tools, different  tracks. Now, I don't think that it's all about hybrid, I think it's about using them appropriately when, when it works. I think that the other thing that I that I'm seeing, you know, I'm in the trade  show side of the business  and there's, there's a lot of event organizers that are  going  under  because they don't have the capital to do things.  But what's  interesting is that the niche  that they're serving  are not going  under. So there's a gold rush that's  going on to capture  those niches, A lot of people that were laid off from the big companies  are saying, oh, I can do that.  And they're starting up new events, you're seeing a whole group of people that are, are looking  to this gold rush of abandoned  niches  and there are also finding  new niches  and  they're serving them with events.  For example, the  other day I was at a conference and somebody said, oh you know, we're gonna put a conference  together of  all the dispatchers that work  in  all the different  companies from  the and the and uh for police and fire  and everything else that  dispatching, He  says, oh my God, that's a whole nother nature of people and when you get a niche to find they want to get together.  So there's  this whole thing  about, that's  why I say that, you know, where are the  renaissance of the event  industry because new  things are going to be happening.

Rachel Moore:  Yeah, well and oh God, I love that you brought that up actually know some people who work in dispatch to um and I they've got their own  every, every one of these groups, any one of these niches has all these  commonalities that only they can  relate to, but you can bring them together just to talk about  that and that's  that's the common ground where now you have that launching pad for that event and you're so right, where I think um we're seeing people  tap into that filing,  realizing hate  we, this can get  pretty micro, but it can still have a huge  impact and maybe because it's so micro and  not like on this, oh well we  better just invite tens  of thousands of people, but instead to just meet the needs of that one niche  group can have a huge lasting impact for those experiences.

SUBTOPIC: Going Back To The Office 00:20:11-00:24:09

Rachel Moore:  to normal. Like, okay, if  we tell you yes, you're going to come  back to the office. Um,  they don't treat  it like the first day of school to me, I  always think back to like when  and you know, again, we're kind of in that season right now,  a lot of kids did just go back to school with  all the ins and outs that,  that is happening  right now with the  pandemic going on and everything.  But um, first  day of school is always just  like the super high, you know, like you said, there's serotonin going on, it's like, okay, I'm gonna go see  some friends I haven't seen for  a while, it feels special. It doesn't feel like just any  other day I'm going  in  and I  think that's where so  many people miss the opportunity to not make that a  regular thing, should  not turn that into,  uh, you know,  let's, let's capitalize on that feeling more  often than just like, say once a year  or, you know, making it just about a certain day, but,  but like you said, they're  welcoming people back, why  not make that,  you know,  use the games, use the food  because God knows that  food can speak to anybody just about. But you know, just add that little  bit of special Sprinkle  to it. That makes it feel like, hey, I am in a cool  event, not just an everyday  kind of thing that I can't get excited about

David Adler:  totally, but you can imagine  the doubt that, you know, you have these big expectations, you're going to the office for the first time  and you get  there and nothing's happening  if you,  it's like a downer. So  smart  business companies are, are definitely doing  exactly what you said is  capitalizing on that and event organizers are now managing that process and they're turning those  remote working  because people are gonna do more and  more remote working into when  they do come to the office and get together on a regular basis  into event thinking and it makes it more fun and it also makes it better for the company and you sell more  stuff and you, and it's more  effective.

Rachel Moore:  Such a good point to,  and, and especially  thinking there are a lot  of companies that are  not necessarily gonna go back to the office, they're going to continue to be primarily remote,  at least for the foreseeable  future.  But you talk about that first day for a  fully remote employee, that's a big  challenge. You don't have the big  geographical physical  location to make some big splash. You've  gotta do it virtually.  And so man, I can see a lot of them probably wanted.

David Adler:  Yeah, there's a lot  of, you know, using digital tools  and face to face  tools, different  tracks. Now, I don't think that it's all about hybrid, I think it's about using them appropriately when, when it works. I think that the other thing that I that I'm seeing, you know, I'm in the trade  show side of the business  and there's, there's a lot of event organizers that are  going  under  because they don't have the capital to do things.  But what's  interesting is that the niche  that they're serving  are not going  under. So there's a gold rush that's  going on to capture  those niches, A lot of people that were laid off from the big companies  are saying, oh, I can do that.  And they're starting up new events, you're seeing a whole group of people that are, are looking  to this gold rush of abandoned  niches  and there are also finding  new niches  and  they're serving them with events.  For example, the  other day I was at a conference and somebody said, oh you know, we're gonna put a conference  together of  all the dispatchers that work  in  all the different  companies from  the and the and uh for police and fire  and everything else that  dispatching, He  says, oh my God, that's a whole nother nature of people and when you get a niche to find they want to get together.  So there's  this whole thing  about, that's  why I say that, you know, where are the  renaissance of the event  industry because new  things are going to be happening.

Rachel Moore:  Yeah, well and oh God, I love that you brought that up actually know some people who work in dispatch to um and I they've got their own  every, every one of these groups, any one of these niches has all these  commonalities that only they can  relate to, but you can bring them together just to talk about  that and that's  that's the common ground where now you have that launching pad for that event and you're so right, where I think um we're seeing people  tap into that filing,  realizing hate  we, this can get  pretty micro, but it can still have a huge  impact and maybe because it's so micro and  not like on this, oh well we  better just invite tens  of thousands of people, but instead to just meet the needs of that one niche  group can have a huge lasting impact for those experiences.

SUBTOPIC: Influencer Marketing 00:24:09-00:32:02

David Adler:  The other thing that we found that is also encouraging me on this whole thing, is that  yet the  whole influencer marketing, we always  think is all about the Kardashians.  I actually was thinking about that, I was told about this guy that, that, that is doing social  media for something  called,  um, it's called fab Con, I think it's called Fabulous. But you think about fabulosity and all that, It's about welders and fabricators. And so they all have  their own influencers  and their own instagrams and they're all really cool kick as welders, they added up and you know, they're doing, they're like welding stuff  and so those are people also that are superstars in those  industries, so people are using  event, um, influencer  marketing to capture  these small niches to micro  influencers and yes,  that's another reason to say that, you know, we're doing microcosms of the big things that you see in the consumer world well,

Rachel Moore:  and you know, again, you're, you're giving  such good insight  to anyone who's listening  or watching this,  uh, and realizing that you don't have to be a marketer to want to go to an event. And I think a lot of us, particularly in marketing, we get, tend to get real myopic to think, oh, well, I've got to put on an event that only other, only other marketers would appreciate, oh heck no, I mean there's, there's of course, yes creators and marketers out there are real used to these events,  but like you said,  there's all these other groups of people that um, we all know, we probably interact with them  every single day and if you  were to say, hey,  if we could put together an event that you could go to, you know, electricians or you know, garbage collectors or anything like that or, or janitorial or camp counselors?  Hey, would you like to  go to an event that is just for people like you that work in the same, they'd be like, yes, I would love to congregate with  my people, you know, one of the biggest

David Adler:  events in the world is  called the cement,  it's in  Vegas and it's all the people in the cement business.  So you're  thinking that we  don't have to, the glamour is everywhere. You know, when you think about  it, you can turn anything into glamour and people want to gather no matter  who they are.  So that's so that's  another, another thing that I realized is one of the  reasons that this, we're  in the renaissance because people  are realizing  especially, you know, birds of a feather want to flock together and  it doesn't matter and organizers  need to help it along a little bit so that it's not just a boring, you  know, just a  boring thing

Rachel Moore:  well and you're  look at it that way to event planners were providing a service  by putting that platform or that space or that instance together, that just gives them, can they just  click on a link or go through a door and now  they're in that space, you helped make that happen, and like  you said, that's that  lasting memory too, or there would be like, I  wouldn't have been able to congregate with my birds of a feather, had you not put this together for me? I just rhymed  

David Adler:  yeah, new things that we can figure out what's  right, and the way we talk,  it's kind of like you just created the birth of rapping,

Rachel Moore:  Oh God,  yeah, nobody wants to hear me  rap, that was literally the limit, I can do everybody.  Uh I'm I'm more of a dr  Seuss person myself where it's, you know, it's just the redfish, bluefish and all that stuff, but  but yeah, but you're right, I  mean, and again, thinking about all that, you talked about  musicians coming full circle  that, but also, you know, just there's  so many groups out there  that they can get together and I can just come and watch and enjoy their talent  where I'm where I'm  lacking.

David Adler:  So the third thing that I see happening to support this idea that we're in a great renaissance is that  that you're having um  cities are going to change this whole remote working has changed something, so there's been a lot of talk about how  cities and  offices are going to be hump becoming hubs for socializing, learning and entertainment,  the biggest  thing that's happened in the rebirth of cities after something happens is that it changes for the positive, like the Industrial revolution, all the big businesses left after  the Industrial Revolution,  they left cities  and what happened to those buildings, they were  turned into great condos and great, you know,  great studios  and fun places to live and  that's the cool, there are the coolest places in new york, so I think  you're gonna see a lot of that and  that translates into events  in many cases.  Also, I think what's going to  happen is that these empty  spaces that are happening are going to become  basically  exhibition  halls for industries that  are permanent,  but you're  gonna have to make them so they  change. So a  company is going to have  a trade show booth  with  all the other companies  in their field and they're gonna be competing and that's going to be from  a remote worker point of view, they won't go to  their office, they'll go to this  trade show booth to  gather to meet customers and things like  that and it's gonna be really cool  and dynamic,  but you know, the fourth floor of of the  Pan Am building  will be the  place that the,  that the cement guys meet, you know, that  you're going to see  more and more of that and it's going to happen, it's going to be also good for the event  ecosystem.

Rachel Moore:  How do you um David, I want to ask you to, So I know we're talking about like cities and metropolis and stuff like that, but when it comes to like more rural communities may be smaller towns, how do you see them  kind of figuring into  that, that, that  renaissance that's coming and it will those  strictly be limited to virtual do you think or do you think we might see some more micro  um, you know, events that transformed those communities are, are sprouting up in, in rural areas. I think you're

David Adler:  gonna see a lot  more actually actually was  discussing the idea of  doing  trade show tourism  because all of a  sudden you have said, you know,  maybe I want to be a  welder and  then I'd like to go to the  welding conference. I would never have  thought about going to the welding  conference, but that opens up  my mind to a whole different thing or so there's ways that you're  going to see conferences all around.  I also think you're gonna see  my smaller  cities are going to become  a place where big  trade shows are going to happen because it gets, makes you feel like  you're, you're owning the town  as opposed to,  so there's a little bit of a, of, of,  you know, both, both sides happening. I think that's going to definitely really work.  The other thing that I think is going to happen is that,  uh, you know how in recipes, everybody wants to deconstruct the recipes well, people want to deconstruct deep construct events  now. So these huge  events are going to becoming lots of smaller, intimate events and people are going to want to, you know, divide up  in the birds of a feather, in their own industry, like all the communications people, all the marketing people, all the, you know, all the, all the HR people, you're going to see more and more of that. So these big,  huge events are going to be  smaller  with a bigger  envelope maybe, but they're going to be smaller. So there'll be more of these smaller events because people ultimately want  intimacy.  Yes, If you know how you go  to a big event for 10,000 people  and you never get to talk to anybody.

Rachel Moore:  Yeah,  well that's a great point. Like I'm  actually, I'm going to attend a virtual conferences for marketers. Um, but  I know there's gonna be  tons of people there, thousands of people  attending, but I'm  already planning like  I know a couple of the people who are also  attending virtually and we're  just going to plan our own  virtual little space where we can be like, okay,  why don't you go to that  one, go to that session, I'll go to this session, Let's come  back and compare notes  and talk about what we got  out of it because,  you know, yes, we can get the stuff on demand later, but we want that little space where you'd be  like, let's talk, let's do some insider chatter about this. This is really cool.  

David Adler:  The most successful digital platforms are the ones that break up into smaller groups. Yes. And and you get to know people in a way that you're  really, you can't  hide  uh in a in a digital meeting room  because they go around the room and they say, how about you? And so you got to pay attention to the whole time. So I think that that's really going to be  interesting.  Um

Rachel Moore:  and David,  sorry, go ahead,

David Adler:  Go ahead. And it brings up my 5th point is that  we're in the age of the collaboration artist, I call it  the person that  is the facilitator becomes more important than ever because it's, you can have all the beautiful googles and things like that. But if, if nobody knows how to get people get the  girls to dance with the boys  at the elementary school or junior high school dance, then nothing happens.  So I believe that that the  whole idea of  being a facilitator and  knowing how  to connect people is going to be one of these skills that are going to be beyond valuable.

SUBTOPIC: Influencer Marketing - Is It All About the Kardashians... 00:24:09-00:32:02

David Adler:  The other thing that we found that is also encouraging me on this whole thing, is that  yet the  whole influencer marketing, we always  think is all about the Kardashians.  I actually was thinking about that, I was told about this guy that, that, that is doing social  media for something  called,  um, it's called fab Con, I think it's called Fabulous. But you think about fabulosity and all that, It's about welders and fabricators. And so they all have  their own influencers  and their own instagrams and they're all really cool kick as welders, they added up and you know, they're doing, they're like welding stuff  and so those are people also that are superstars in those  industries, so people are using  event, um, influencer  marketing to capture  these small niches to micro  influencers and yes,  that's another reason to say that, you know, we're doing microcosms of the big things that you see in the consumer world well,

Rachel Moore:  and you know, again, you're, you're giving  such good insight  to anyone who's listening  or watching this,  uh, and realizing that you don't have to be a marketer to want to go to an event. And I think a lot of us, particularly in marketing, we get, tend to get real myopic to think, oh, well, I've got to put on an event that only other, only other marketers would appreciate, oh heck no, I mean there's, there's of course, yes creators and marketers out there are real used to these events,  but like you said,  there's all these other groups of people that um, we all know, we probably interact with them  every single day and if you  were to say, hey,  if we could put together an event that you could go to, you know, electricians or you know, garbage collectors or anything like that or, or janitorial or camp counselors?  Hey, would you like to  go to an event that is just for people like you that work in the same, they'd be like, yes, I would love to congregate with  my people, you know, one of the biggest

David Adler:  events in the world is  called the cement,  it's in  Vegas and it's all the people in the cement business.  So you're  thinking that we  don't have to, the glamour is everywhere. You know, when you think about  it, you can turn anything into glamour and people want to gather no matter  who they are.  So that's so that's  another, another thing that I realized is one of the  reasons that this, we're  in the renaissance because people  are realizing  especially, you know, birds of a feather want to flock together and  it doesn't matter and organizers  need to help it along a little bit so that it's not just a boring, you  know, just a  boring thing

Rachel Moore:  well and you're  look at it that way to event planners were providing a service  by putting that platform or that space or that instance together, that just gives them, can they just  click on a link or go through a door and now  they're in that space, you helped make that happen, and like  you said, that's that  lasting memory too, or there would be like, I  wouldn't have been able to congregate with my birds of a feather, had you not put this together for me? I just rhymed  

David Adler:  yeah, new things that we can figure out what's  right, and the way we talk,  it's kind of like you just created the birth of rapping,

Rachel Moore:  Oh God,  yeah, nobody wants to hear me  rap, that was literally the limit, I can do everybody.  Uh I'm I'm more of a dr  Seuss person myself where it's, you know, it's just the redfish, bluefish and all that stuff, but  but yeah, but you're right, I  mean, and again, thinking about all that, you talked about  musicians coming full circle  that, but also, you know, just there's  so many groups out there  that they can get together and I can just come and watch and enjoy their talent  where I'm where I'm  lacking.

David Adler:  So the third thing that I see happening to support this idea that we're in a great renaissance is that  that you're having um  cities are going to change this whole remote working has changed something, so there's been a lot of talk about how  cities and  offices are going to be hump becoming hubs for socializing, learning and entertainment,  the biggest  thing that's happened in the rebirth of cities after something happens is that it changes for the positive, like the Industrial revolution, all the big businesses left after  the Industrial Revolution,  they left cities  and what happened to those buildings, they were  turned into great condos and great, you know,  great studios  and fun places to live and  that's the cool, there are the coolest places in new york, so I think  you're gonna see a lot of that and  that translates into events  in many cases.  Also, I think what's going to  happen is that these empty  spaces that are happening are going to become  basically  exhibition  halls for industries that  are permanent,  but you're  gonna have to make them so they  change. So a  company is going to have  a trade show booth  with  all the other companies  in their field and they're gonna be competing and that's going to be from  a remote worker point of view, they won't go to  their office, they'll go to this  trade show booth to  gather to meet customers and things like  that and it's gonna be really cool  and dynamic,  but you know, the fourth floor of of the  Pan Am building  will be the  place that the,  that the cement guys meet, you know, that  you're going to see  more and more of that and it's going to happen, it's going to be also good for the event  ecosystem.

Rachel Moore:  How do you um David, I want to ask you to, So I know we're talking about like cities and metropolis and stuff like that, but when it comes to like more rural communities may be smaller towns, how do you see them  kind of figuring into  that, that, that  renaissance that's coming and it will those  strictly be limited to virtual do you think or do you think we might see some more micro  um, you know, events that transformed those communities are, are sprouting up in, in rural areas. I think you're

David Adler:  gonna see a lot  more actually actually was  discussing the idea of  doing  trade show tourism  because all of a  sudden you have said, you know,  maybe I want to be a  welder and  then I'd like to go to the  welding conference. I would never have  thought about going to the welding  conference, but that opens up  my mind to a whole different thing or so there's ways that you're  going to see conferences all around.  I also think you're gonna see  my smaller  cities are going to become  a place where big  trade shows are going to happen because it gets, makes you feel like  you're, you're owning the town  as opposed to,  so there's a little bit of a, of, of,  you know, both, both sides happening. I think that's going to definitely really work.  The other thing that I think is going to happen is that,  uh, you know how in recipes, everybody wants to deconstruct the recipes well, people want to deconstruct deep construct events  now. So these huge  events are going to becoming lots of smaller, intimate events and people are going to want to, you know, divide up  in the birds of a feather, in their own industry, like all the communications people, all the marketing people, all the, you know, all the, all the HR people, you're going to see more and more of that. So these big,  huge events are going to be  smaller  with a bigger  envelope maybe, but they're going to be smaller. So there'll be more of these smaller events because people ultimately want  intimacy.  Yes, If you know how you go  to a big event for 10,000 people  and you never get to talk to anybody.

Rachel Moore:  Yeah,  well that's a great point. Like I'm  actually, I'm going to attend a virtual conferences for marketers. Um, but  I know there's gonna be  tons of people there, thousands of people  attending, but I'm  already planning like  I know a couple of the people who are also  attending virtually and we're  just going to plan our own  virtual little space where we can be like, okay,  why don't you go to that  one, go to that session, I'll go to this session, Let's come  back and compare notes  and talk about what we got  out of it because,  you know, yes, we can get the stuff on demand later, but we want that little space where you'd be  like, let's talk, let's do some insider chatter about this. This is really cool.  

David Adler:  The most successful digital platforms are the ones that break up into smaller groups. Yes. And and you get to know people in a way that you're  really, you can't  hide  uh in a in a digital meeting room  because they go around the room and they say, how about you? And so you got to pay attention to the whole time. So I think that that's really going to be  interesting.  Um

Rachel Moore:  and David,  sorry, go ahead,

David Adler:  Go ahead. And it brings up my 5th point is that  we're in the age of the collaboration artist, I call it  the person that  is the facilitator becomes more important than ever because it's, you can have all the beautiful googles and things like that. But if, if nobody knows how to get people get the  girls to dance with the boys  at the elementary school or junior high school dance, then nothing happens.  So I believe that that the  whole idea of  being a facilitator and  knowing how  to connect people is going to be one of these skills that are going to be beyond valuable.

SUBTOPIC: Collaboration Artists 00:32:03-00:33:14

Rachel Moore:  Yes, thank you for  saying that. I actually made  that reference to, I  think it was just in the last week, I was saying, you know how  when you do go to a dance floor  and I said, you know, whether it's at a  wedding, we talked about that  or just at a school dance or  something, nobody  wants to go first, but it always takes that first person  or couple or whatever group that will go out  and start dancing. And that makes everyone else feel like, okay, now I can  go,  anyone who felt like I needed someone to kick this off for me, you're so  right, that that  kind of just a catalyst person  can, can really

David Adler:  get things going or being I call that event organizers have to become collaboration artists, whether they're collaborating and creating the event or they're helping their audience collaborate to talk to each other.  Yeah.  And that, to me is the soft skill  that is going to become the most valuable thing that you can ever have happened, I think

Rachel Moore:  events

David Adler:  and and it and it makes  sense. I mean, how many  times the great teacher is a collaboration artist?  The great orchestra leader is the ultimate collaboration, But it's how do you  orchestrate it  in a way that it doesn't  happen by accident.  Yeah. That that there are techniques to  operating to running a  meeting. Most people don't even know how to run a meeting.  Uh huh.

SUBTOPIC: Collaboration Artists 00:32:03-00:33:14

Rachel Moore:  Yes, thank you for  saying that. I actually made  that reference to, I  think it was just in the last week, I was saying, you know how  when you do go to a dance floor  and I said, you know, whether it's at a  wedding, we talked about that  or just at a school dance or  something, nobody  wants to go first, but it always takes that first person  or couple or whatever group that will go out  and start dancing. And that makes everyone else feel like, okay, now I can  go,  anyone who felt like I needed someone to kick this off for me, you're so  right, that that  kind of just a catalyst person  can, can really

David Adler:  get things going or being I call that event organizers have to become collaboration artists, whether they're collaborating and creating the event or they're helping their audience collaborate to talk to each other.  Yeah.  And that, to me is the soft skill  that is going to become the most valuable thing that you can ever have happened, I think

Rachel Moore:  events

David Adler:  and and it and it makes  sense. I mean, how many  times the great teacher is a collaboration artist?  The great orchestra leader is the ultimate collaboration, But it's how do you  orchestrate it  in a way that it doesn't  happen by accident.  Yeah. That that there are techniques to  operating to running a  meeting. Most people don't even know how to run a meeting.  Uh huh.

SUBTOPIC: The Wisdom of the Crowd 00:33:14-00:35:01

David Adler:  Uh huh.  You're so right,  then  people are that are introverted  and have to be dealt with differently than

Rachel Moore:  people that are extroverted.  That's right. And  also, and to not treat one group like  they're better than the other.  Everybody's got value, but that person who can bring them all together and make them feel like they're each important equally  for sure.  David, um I know, and we're actually, you know, we have, we're kind of limited on time today too. And I want to have

David Adler:  one

Rachel Moore:  more, Bring it, bring it for you guys. Okay.  

David Adler:  I think that the virtual event platforms, our poet poised  to be one of the most  powerful ways to  solve problems because they  capture the wisdom of  the crowd.  I  believe that if you  get the right collaboration artists in the  right digital platform, you can do the largest brain  trauma in the world  and and solve things like climate change  and  everything because it  is one of the  greatest tools  that has been ever  that has ever been invented in  order to capture the wisdom  of the crowd.

Rachel Moore:  That's so true.  Well, in the barrier for entry is  less with a virtual event,  you literally can get more people in the room or minds  in the room, can  I just say, um you below wouldn't, it would be great if like we were the platform where climate change got solved because of a particular meeting we had. I'm I'm staking our claim right now that we are going to be that platform that they will talk in years to come,  that we have gained back because we stop climate  change or that we  solved it, that they're gonna say and it all began back in an event that was hosted in the hub below platform? And David. I'm staking my claim. We have dibs on that right now.  I love it. I know, but hey, I'm all about, hey, if we can  solve climate change, wherever it happens, let's do that together. But you're right, Virtual events, I think, um again, just bringing people together that may not have gotten together otherwise,  but  because that barrier to entry  is lowered and

SUBTOPIC: Bring It, Bring It For You 00:33:14-00:35:01

David Adler:  Uh huh.  You're so right,  then  people are that are introverted  and have to be dealt with differently than

Rachel Moore:  people that are extroverted.  That's right. And  also, and to not treat one group like  they're better than the other.  Everybody's got value, but that person who can bring them all together and make them feel like they're each important equally  for sure.  David, um I know, and we're actually, you know, we have, we're kind of limited on time today too. And I want to have

David Adler:  one

Rachel Moore:  more, Bring it, bring it for you guys. Okay.  

David Adler:  I think that the virtual event platforms, our poet poised  to be one of the most  powerful ways to  solve problems because they  capture the wisdom of  the crowd.  I  believe that if you  get the right collaboration artists in the  right digital platform, you can do the largest brain  trauma in the world  and and solve things like climate change  and  everything because it  is one of the  greatest tools  that has been ever  that has ever been invented in  order to capture the wisdom  of the crowd.

Rachel Moore:  That's so true.  Well, in the barrier for entry is  less with a virtual event,  you literally can get more people in the room or minds  in the room, can  I just say, um you below wouldn't, it would be great if like we were the platform where climate change got solved because of a particular meeting we had. I'm I'm staking our claim right now that we are going to be that platform that they will talk in years to come,  that we have gained back because we stop climate  change or that we  solved it, that they're gonna say and it all began back in an event that was hosted in the hub below platform? And David. I'm staking my claim. We have dibs on that right now.  I love it. I know, but hey, I'm all about, hey, if we can  solve climate change, wherever it happens, let's do that together. But you're right, Virtual events, I think, um again, just bringing people together that may not have gotten together otherwise,  but  because that barrier to entry  is lowered and

SUBTOPIC: Are You Going to Be Publishing an Article? 00:35:01-00:35:46

Rachel Moore:  where can we  find more about  what you're talking about today with  this renaissance of the events industry? Are  you going to be  publishing this somewhere?

David Adler:  Yes, I'm publishing an article. I'm starting to talk about it everywhere.  And I think it's something where I just want more information for other people. Let help me do it because I think it's something that we have to raise the self esteem of our industry,  which is more important because we've been battered.  Uh and and we have a whole new group of people coming in to to take it to the next level. And I think the digital platforms have been the catalyst to do that because you're making us realize that there's a whole lot of other stuff out there that we can do that. We're not limited to a physical event.

Rachel Moore:  For sure. No, I challenge  accepted. And David thank you so

SUBTOPIC: Are You Going to Be Publishing an Article? 00:35:01-00:35:46

Rachel Moore:  where can we  find more about  what you're talking about today with  this renaissance of the events industry? Are  you going to be  publishing this somewhere?

David Adler:  Yes, I'm publishing an article. I'm starting to talk about it everywhere.  And I think it's something where I just want more information for other people. Let help me do it because I think it's something that we have to raise the self esteem of our industry,  which is more important because we've been battered.  Uh and and we have a whole new group of people coming in to to take it to the next level. And I think the digital platforms have been the catalyst to do that because you're making us realize that there's a whole lot of other stuff out there that we can do that. We're not limited to a physical event.

Rachel Moore:  For sure. No, I challenge  accepted. And David thank you so


TOPIC: Gosh, I Love That You're Talking... 00:11:18-00:35:46

SUBTOPIC: Gosh, I Love That You're Talking About This 00:11:18-00:14:27

Rachel Moore:  Well, such a, it's such an interesting, um, you  know, exercise in human  psychology to, I mean, gosh, and, and again, I love that you're talking about this too because I don't, I don't have time, I don't have time to go to every event and go judge it. I mean if  I was getting paid as a journalist to say, hey, I want you  to go to literally every event you can  and then right on that stuff, you know, just the takeaways, what you saw. Sure, and that's what you're basically  doing and, and  that's so that's so valuable because yes, all of us, we're not at war, but we definitely are in a very strong competition to put on the best event out there and heck yeah, if I could learn from what somebody else did and said, hey, that worked over there,

David Adler:  The event, I think you have to think of the event  spaces the battle  and you're taking and you're gonna get  one company, you're gonna meet people from  another company and you're gonna see what they are doing  and hear about their  little secrets and then go back and say, hey boss, hey, guess what I heard last night at this event  because it's  the only way to really do  it legitimately,  yeah, you can go online, but that's, you know, that's just  another way of doing it.  Primary research  in a sense when you think about  it and you think about it. But you know, the  word gossip is also  that two people want to know like, what are these guys doing and what are they wearing? And  like, you know,  that's a nice new ring  that woman got, maybe  she's engaged. You  know, that's, that's right. Well,

Rachel Moore:  and let's, let's not kid ourselves, everybody's talking about that  stuff still to, I mean,  I, I've been on stage at a, at a couple of, you know, our events that we host to with you below. And  you know, I do put a lot of thought, I'm like,  okay, I gotta make sure because I'm sure somebody's gonna have an opinion about my makeup or about my hair, about like jewelry. I mean, all that's still inter playing.  They're mixed in with the rest of everything you're experiencing at  an event. And so, but  I love that,  forget  it. There's, there's a database. So  as somebody  who's really interested in the  tracking of information  and knowing that it's  happening and, you know, having  mixed feelings about how much is getting  tracked and how much isn't knowing that this is happening for the events industry  is  fascinating to me and of course, you know, I want all the  information. So I'm glad that you're  here with us today to talk about  that,

David Adler:  you know, it's so funny, we  grew to being the largest website for event organizers  To get the style side of the business rather than, you know, if anybody can figure out, you know how much alcohol it takes to get like 300 people drunk off  their assets, but you  know, to make it, you know, memorable  forever.  It's you know, that they have hired this event designer and they did  that and like, do you remember, I mean  sometimes it's so funny,  even  on the personal wedding  side, people will talk about their personal events for the for the, that they have  A wedding and 50 years  later they're saying, oh my God, you remember that, what we did it, my wedding,  it's  great sculpture and they did this, blah, blah, blah  people. It's  it's it's a way of engaging people that that  doesn't happen  in other types of things.

Rachel Moore:  I love that you said that too, because it is, I mean,  it gets  back to that experience of  things where sure, I  mean, and I  even think about how people spend money nowadays,  like you could buy  things you do, you want to buy experiences  and if people are  investing their time and money into going to an experience and  you send them  away where they're going to be talking  about it, whether  It's next week, next month, next year, five  years from now or beyond

SUBTOPIC: Event Space Battlefield 00:11:18-00:14:27

Rachel Moore:  Well, such a, it's such an interesting, um, you  know, exercise in human  psychology to, I mean, gosh, and, and again, I love that you're talking about this too because I don't, I don't have time, I don't have time to go to every event and go judge it. I mean if  I was getting paid as a journalist to say, hey, I want you  to go to literally every event you can  and then right on that stuff, you know, just the takeaways, what you saw. Sure, and that's what you're basically  doing and, and  that's so that's so valuable because yes, all of us, we're not at war, but we definitely are in a very strong competition to put on the best event out there and heck yeah, if I could learn from what somebody else did and said, hey, that worked over there,

David Adler:  The event, I think you have to think of the event  spaces the battle  and you're taking and you're gonna get  one company, you're gonna meet people from  another company and you're gonna see what they are doing  and hear about their  little secrets and then go back and say, hey boss, hey, guess what I heard last night at this event  because it's  the only way to really do  it legitimately,  yeah, you can go online, but that's, you know, that's just  another way of doing it.  Primary research  in a sense when you think about  it and you think about it. But you know, the  word gossip is also  that two people want to know like, what are these guys doing and what are they wearing? And  like, you know,  that's a nice new ring  that woman got, maybe  she's engaged. You  know, that's, that's right. Well,

Rachel Moore:  and let's, let's not kid ourselves, everybody's talking about that  stuff still to, I mean,  I, I've been on stage at a, at a couple of, you know, our events that we host to with you below. And  you know, I do put a lot of thought, I'm like,  okay, I gotta make sure because I'm sure somebody's gonna have an opinion about my makeup or about my hair, about like jewelry. I mean, all that's still inter playing.  They're mixed in with the rest of everything you're experiencing at  an event. And so, but  I love that,  forget  it. There's, there's a database. So  as somebody  who's really interested in the  tracking of information  and knowing that it's  happening and, you know, having  mixed feelings about how much is getting  tracked and how much isn't knowing that this is happening for the events industry  is  fascinating to me and of course, you know, I want all the  information. So I'm glad that you're  here with us today to talk about  that,

David Adler:  you know, it's so funny, we  grew to being the largest website for event organizers  To get the style side of the business rather than, you know, if anybody can figure out, you know how much alcohol it takes to get like 300 people drunk off  their assets, but you  know, to make it, you know, memorable  forever.  It's you know, that they have hired this event designer and they did  that and like, do you remember, I mean  sometimes it's so funny,  even  on the personal wedding  side, people will talk about their personal events for the for the, that they have  A wedding and 50 years  later they're saying, oh my God, you remember that, what we did it, my wedding,  it's  great sculpture and they did this, blah, blah, blah  people. It's  it's it's a way of engaging people that that  doesn't happen  in other types of things.

Rachel Moore:  I love that you said that too, because it is, I mean,  it gets  back to that experience of  things where sure, I  mean, and I  even think about how people spend money nowadays,  like you could buy  things you do, you want to buy experiences  and if people are  investing their time and money into going to an experience and  you send them  away where they're going to be talking  about it, whether  It's next week, next month, next year, five  years from now or beyond

SUBTOPIC: How to Create Intimacy at Events 00:14:27-00:20:11

Rachel Moore:  that lasting experience, because people, as you  mentioned, they're going to talk  about it and that means you're going to get, be able to succeed more and more of your events. But I love that you  bring that whole,  it is just  like a wedding where I think all  of us would love to put on events that are like those epic weddings that  nobody will, nobody will

David Adler:  forget. So the one thing that I always, whenever I speak on events, I always bring it back to  the best event  organizers I know are  The directors that did summer camps in the 70s and 60's  And I don't even the 80s and 90s, and but if you have a summer camp experience, you know what I'm thinking about, you know, that there's something that they do on a regular basis that makes you  want to come back and  sometimes these high powered conferences are nothing more than reinventing summer camp. There were some of them are horrible,  but the idea is  that you want that feeling that, you know, you're gonna sing that song and you're gonna get goose bumps, you  know? Yes,  so, so, so the idea is to how do you create intimacy at events and and make them feel, you know, basically people are selling you know memories in many cases  remember and also  when you remember that sticks  and then you make buying decisions and you make  relationship decisions  and you make creation  decisions  and you if there's something about it that that you can see it on their face, there's an  oxytocin  exchange  that happens in events that usually it's the chemical between moms and kids, but it really happens everywhere. There's also when you think about events, you think about  the social physics  of how ideas flow  because ideas flow in ways almost only the virus is working.  You know, when you think about  it like people are they're having these viruses and uh, and you see how, you know,  ideas  flow in the same way. That's what I  learned recently. That when you think  about it, if you can control  it and do it in a good way,  then you can really make things  happen and how quickly things are happening.  Yeah, that's right.

Rachel Moore:  Well, and so this kind  of takes us into  two and I I do have some  personal questions to ask you toward the end because I of course  want to have everybody know more about you and we're learning so much already, but we'll  we'll get into it too. But  you're talking about a lot of, you know, I think experience can be a central  theme we're talking about here  too, and memories and  but just um  not just I I just feel like so many people, especially  if they don't work in the events  industry, don't really think about  events, as you mentioned, that there  there's there's psychology,  there's chemical exchange is happening there, where you're actually impacting how someone thinks and feels, and I think  that's probably segways  nicely. I know you're working on some stuff right now that  probably  translate right into  there, so tell us what you're working  on right now,  as far as far as  events right now are  looking and what your perspective is on them.

David Adler:  It occurred to me that we're at an inflection point in the event industry,  but I think what  we're seeing, you know, we've been through this awful down slide  where people all of a sudden appreciate events  because they have not been able to go to them,  and you're seeing the rise of the of the of the of the digital platform, you're seeing all these things are trying  to emulate  the face to face event.  And I see what's happening though now, after 20 months or whatever number of months we're doing in this.  that we're in the, on the  verge of a great event industry renaissance that I think from the point of view of,  you know, we've hit the bottom, but  in every sort of downturn and every type of crisis comes opportunity,  and and you're gonna, you're seeing that now, and I was  trying to go through  where I see that  happening. And  and what I  Have found that one  thing that, that people really need to know is that there is a need for human gathering, we teach, we learn, we socialize all that kind of stuff. And so I think that that not only is it going to be  a gold mine  that's going to happen,  but it's  also going to be a  major way to think.  And  so the first thing that I'm finding is that event thinking is going to permeate  everything from just managing  the act of employees,  going to work to managing  a senior, a senior center  in a sense, it's about this temporary  moment that  that happened,  that  events are about the temporary  moment. You never want to  decorate your  house, like you're, you're having a party because you wouldn't get  sick of having all that, those balloons  around and so you went like nice solid marble and things like that. But when you do a temporary event  thinking  it's, it transports you for the moment.  And  so even when people are coming back to the office now, event  organizers are using that as a way to,  to encourage people to come back and to celebrate that they're coming back.  And and I see that that, that's a whole area of thinking and  methodology,  remote work is changing everything  and this, it's  creating a whole new sort of type of events. My mother was in a,  a memory  unit for Alzheimer's, which was awful, but it was fun  interesting to see the  camp directors  at the Alzheimer Clinic trying to get everybody to do stuff because they hold the day, you know,  they, and so  event organizers are really like  Camp counselors in one in  one sense and  then thinking is going to become more and more important  and you know, and  everything is going to get  involved in that and you're gonna see more  catering will get  involved in those kinds of things and gifting and experiential agencies to make  it so that when people  come back, they remember,  oh  my God, this is the first day, back  in every quarter, we're going to do something I

Rachel Moore:  love, oh my gosh, you are just  speaking music to my ears right now because I do feel like  everyone kind of just wants everything to go back

SUBTOPIC: How to Create Intimacy at Events 00:14:27-00:20:11

Rachel Moore:  that lasting experience, because people, as you  mentioned, they're going to talk  about it and that means you're going to get, be able to succeed more and more of your events. But I love that you  bring that whole,  it is just  like a wedding where I think all  of us would love to put on events that are like those epic weddings that  nobody will, nobody will

David Adler:  forget. So the one thing that I always, whenever I speak on events, I always bring it back to  the best event  organizers I know are  The directors that did summer camps in the 70s and 60's  And I don't even the 80s and 90s, and but if you have a summer camp experience, you know what I'm thinking about, you know, that there's something that they do on a regular basis that makes you  want to come back and  sometimes these high powered conferences are nothing more than reinventing summer camp. There were some of them are horrible,  but the idea is  that you want that feeling that, you know, you're gonna sing that song and you're gonna get goose bumps, you  know? Yes,  so, so, so the idea is to how do you create intimacy at events and and make them feel, you know, basically people are selling you know memories in many cases  remember and also  when you remember that sticks  and then you make buying decisions and you make  relationship decisions  and you make creation  decisions  and you if there's something about it that that you can see it on their face, there's an  oxytocin  exchange  that happens in events that usually it's the chemical between moms and kids, but it really happens everywhere. There's also when you think about events, you think about  the social physics  of how ideas flow  because ideas flow in ways almost only the virus is working.  You know, when you think about  it like people are they're having these viruses and uh, and you see how, you know,  ideas  flow in the same way. That's what I  learned recently. That when you think  about it, if you can control  it and do it in a good way,  then you can really make things  happen and how quickly things are happening.  Yeah, that's right.

Rachel Moore:  Well, and so this kind  of takes us into  two and I I do have some  personal questions to ask you toward the end because I of course  want to have everybody know more about you and we're learning so much already, but we'll  we'll get into it too. But  you're talking about a lot of, you know, I think experience can be a central  theme we're talking about here  too, and memories and  but just um  not just I I just feel like so many people, especially  if they don't work in the events  industry, don't really think about  events, as you mentioned, that there  there's there's psychology,  there's chemical exchange is happening there, where you're actually impacting how someone thinks and feels, and I think  that's probably segways  nicely. I know you're working on some stuff right now that  probably  translate right into  there, so tell us what you're working  on right now,  as far as far as  events right now are  looking and what your perspective is on them.

David Adler:  It occurred to me that we're at an inflection point in the event industry,  but I think what  we're seeing, you know, we've been through this awful down slide  where people all of a sudden appreciate events  because they have not been able to go to them,  and you're seeing the rise of the of the of the of the digital platform, you're seeing all these things are trying  to emulate  the face to face event.  And I see what's happening though now, after 20 months or whatever number of months we're doing in this.  that we're in the, on the  verge of a great event industry renaissance that I think from the point of view of,  you know, we've hit the bottom, but  in every sort of downturn and every type of crisis comes opportunity,  and and you're gonna, you're seeing that now, and I was  trying to go through  where I see that  happening. And  and what I  Have found that one  thing that, that people really need to know is that there is a need for human gathering, we teach, we learn, we socialize all that kind of stuff. And so I think that that not only is it going to be  a gold mine  that's going to happen,  but it's  also going to be a  major way to think.  And  so the first thing that I'm finding is that event thinking is going to permeate  everything from just managing  the act of employees,  going to work to managing  a senior, a senior center  in a sense, it's about this temporary  moment that  that happened,  that  events are about the temporary  moment. You never want to  decorate your  house, like you're, you're having a party because you wouldn't get  sick of having all that, those balloons  around and so you went like nice solid marble and things like that. But when you do a temporary event  thinking  it's, it transports you for the moment.  And  so even when people are coming back to the office now, event  organizers are using that as a way to,  to encourage people to come back and to celebrate that they're coming back.  And and I see that that, that's a whole area of thinking and  methodology,  remote work is changing everything  and this, it's  creating a whole new sort of type of events. My mother was in a,  a memory  unit for Alzheimer's, which was awful, but it was fun  interesting to see the  camp directors  at the Alzheimer Clinic trying to get everybody to do stuff because they hold the day, you know,  they, and so  event organizers are really like  Camp counselors in one in  one sense and  then thinking is going to become more and more important  and you know, and  everything is going to get  involved in that and you're gonna see more  catering will get  involved in those kinds of things and gifting and experiential agencies to make  it so that when people  come back, they remember,  oh  my God, this is the first day, back  in every quarter, we're going to do something I

Rachel Moore:  love, oh my gosh, you are just  speaking music to my ears right now because I do feel like  everyone kind of just wants everything to go back

SUBTOPIC: The First Day of School 00:20:11-00:24:09

Rachel Moore:  to normal. Like, okay, if  we tell you yes, you're going to come  back to the office. Um,  they don't treat  it like the first day of school to me, I  always think back to like when  and you know, again, we're kind of in that season right now,  a lot of kids did just go back to school with  all the ins and outs that,  that is happening  right now with the  pandemic going on and everything.  But um, first  day of school is always just  like the super high, you know, like you said, there's serotonin going on, it's like, okay, I'm gonna go see  some friends I haven't seen for  a while, it feels special. It doesn't feel like just any  other day I'm going  in  and I  think that's where so  many people miss the opportunity to not make that a  regular thing, should  not turn that into,  uh, you know,  let's, let's capitalize on that feeling more  often than just like, say once a year  or, you know, making it just about a certain day, but,  but like you said, they're  welcoming people back, why  not make that,  you know,  use the games, use the food  because God knows that  food can speak to anybody just about. But you know, just add that little  bit of special Sprinkle  to it. That makes it feel like, hey, I am in a cool  event, not just an everyday  kind of thing that I can't get excited about

David Adler:  totally, but you can imagine  the doubt that, you know, you have these big expectations, you're going to the office for the first time  and you get  there and nothing's happening  if you,  it's like a downer. So  smart  business companies are, are definitely doing  exactly what you said is  capitalizing on that and event organizers are now managing that process and they're turning those  remote working  because people are gonna do more and  more remote working into when  they do come to the office and get together on a regular basis  into event thinking and it makes it more fun and it also makes it better for the company and you sell more  stuff and you, and it's more  effective.

Rachel Moore:  Such a good point to,  and, and especially  thinking there are a lot  of companies that are  not necessarily gonna go back to the office, they're going to continue to be primarily remote,  at least for the foreseeable  future.  But you talk about that first day for a  fully remote employee, that's a big  challenge. You don't have the big  geographical physical  location to make some big splash. You've  gotta do it virtually.  And so man, I can see a lot of them probably wanted.

David Adler:  Yeah, there's a lot  of, you know, using digital tools  and face to face  tools, different  tracks. Now, I don't think that it's all about hybrid, I think it's about using them appropriately when, when it works. I think that the other thing that I that I'm seeing, you know, I'm in the trade  show side of the business  and there's, there's a lot of event organizers that are  going  under  because they don't have the capital to do things.  But what's  interesting is that the niche  that they're serving  are not going  under. So there's a gold rush that's  going on to capture  those niches, A lot of people that were laid off from the big companies  are saying, oh, I can do that.  And they're starting up new events, you're seeing a whole group of people that are, are looking  to this gold rush of abandoned  niches  and there are also finding  new niches  and  they're serving them with events.  For example, the  other day I was at a conference and somebody said, oh you know, we're gonna put a conference  together of  all the dispatchers that work  in  all the different  companies from  the and the and uh for police and fire  and everything else that  dispatching, He  says, oh my God, that's a whole nother nature of people and when you get a niche to find they want to get together.  So there's  this whole thing  about, that's  why I say that, you know, where are the  renaissance of the event  industry because new  things are going to be happening.

Rachel Moore:  Yeah, well and oh God, I love that you brought that up actually know some people who work in dispatch to um and I they've got their own  every, every one of these groups, any one of these niches has all these  commonalities that only they can  relate to, but you can bring them together just to talk about  that and that's  that's the common ground where now you have that launching pad for that event and you're so right, where I think um we're seeing people  tap into that filing,  realizing hate  we, this can get  pretty micro, but it can still have a huge  impact and maybe because it's so micro and  not like on this, oh well we  better just invite tens  of thousands of people, but instead to just meet the needs of that one niche  group can have a huge lasting impact for those experiences.

SUBTOPIC: Going Back To The Office 00:20:11-00:24:09

Rachel Moore:  to normal. Like, okay, if  we tell you yes, you're going to come  back to the office. Um,  they don't treat  it like the first day of school to me, I  always think back to like when  and you know, again, we're kind of in that season right now,  a lot of kids did just go back to school with  all the ins and outs that,  that is happening  right now with the  pandemic going on and everything.  But um, first  day of school is always just  like the super high, you know, like you said, there's serotonin going on, it's like, okay, I'm gonna go see  some friends I haven't seen for  a while, it feels special. It doesn't feel like just any  other day I'm going  in  and I  think that's where so  many people miss the opportunity to not make that a  regular thing, should  not turn that into,  uh, you know,  let's, let's capitalize on that feeling more  often than just like, say once a year  or, you know, making it just about a certain day, but,  but like you said, they're  welcoming people back, why  not make that,  you know,  use the games, use the food  because God knows that  food can speak to anybody just about. But you know, just add that little  bit of special Sprinkle  to it. That makes it feel like, hey, I am in a cool  event, not just an everyday  kind of thing that I can't get excited about

David Adler:  totally, but you can imagine  the doubt that, you know, you have these big expectations, you're going to the office for the first time  and you get  there and nothing's happening  if you,  it's like a downer. So  smart  business companies are, are definitely doing  exactly what you said is  capitalizing on that and event organizers are now managing that process and they're turning those  remote working  because people are gonna do more and  more remote working into when  they do come to the office and get together on a regular basis  into event thinking and it makes it more fun and it also makes it better for the company and you sell more  stuff and you, and it's more  effective.

Rachel Moore:  Such a good point to,  and, and especially  thinking there are a lot  of companies that are  not necessarily gonna go back to the office, they're going to continue to be primarily remote,  at least for the foreseeable  future.  But you talk about that first day for a  fully remote employee, that's a big  challenge. You don't have the big  geographical physical  location to make some big splash. You've  gotta do it virtually.  And so man, I can see a lot of them probably wanted.

David Adler:  Yeah, there's a lot  of, you know, using digital tools  and face to face  tools, different  tracks. Now, I don't think that it's all about hybrid, I think it's about using them appropriately when, when it works. I think that the other thing that I that I'm seeing, you know, I'm in the trade  show side of the business  and there's, there's a lot of event organizers that are  going  under  because they don't have the capital to do things.  But what's  interesting is that the niche  that they're serving  are not going  under. So there's a gold rush that's  going on to capture  those niches, A lot of people that were laid off from the big companies  are saying, oh, I can do that.  And they're starting up new events, you're seeing a whole group of people that are, are looking  to this gold rush of abandoned  niches  and there are also finding  new niches  and  they're serving them with events.  For example, the  other day I was at a conference and somebody said, oh you know, we're gonna put a conference  together of  all the dispatchers that work  in  all the different  companies from  the and the and uh for police and fire  and everything else that  dispatching, He  says, oh my God, that's a whole nother nature of people and when you get a niche to find they want to get together.  So there's  this whole thing  about, that's  why I say that, you know, where are the  renaissance of the event  industry because new  things are going to be happening.

Rachel Moore:  Yeah, well and oh God, I love that you brought that up actually know some people who work in dispatch to um and I they've got their own  every, every one of these groups, any one of these niches has all these  commonalities that only they can  relate to, but you can bring them together just to talk about  that and that's  that's the common ground where now you have that launching pad for that event and you're so right, where I think um we're seeing people  tap into that filing,  realizing hate  we, this can get  pretty micro, but it can still have a huge  impact and maybe because it's so micro and  not like on this, oh well we  better just invite tens  of thousands of people, but instead to just meet the needs of that one niche  group can have a huge lasting impact for those experiences.

SUBTOPIC: Influencer Marketing 00:24:09-00:32:02

David Adler:  The other thing that we found that is also encouraging me on this whole thing, is that  yet the  whole influencer marketing, we always  think is all about the Kardashians.  I actually was thinking about that, I was told about this guy that, that, that is doing social  media for something  called,  um, it's called fab Con, I think it's called Fabulous. But you think about fabulosity and all that, It's about welders and fabricators. And so they all have  their own influencers  and their own instagrams and they're all really cool kick as welders, they added up and you know, they're doing, they're like welding stuff  and so those are people also that are superstars in those  industries, so people are using  event, um, influencer  marketing to capture  these small niches to micro  influencers and yes,  that's another reason to say that, you know, we're doing microcosms of the big things that you see in the consumer world well,

Rachel Moore:  and you know, again, you're, you're giving  such good insight  to anyone who's listening  or watching this,  uh, and realizing that you don't have to be a marketer to want to go to an event. And I think a lot of us, particularly in marketing, we get, tend to get real myopic to think, oh, well, I've got to put on an event that only other, only other marketers would appreciate, oh heck no, I mean there's, there's of course, yes creators and marketers out there are real used to these events,  but like you said,  there's all these other groups of people that um, we all know, we probably interact with them  every single day and if you  were to say, hey,  if we could put together an event that you could go to, you know, electricians or you know, garbage collectors or anything like that or, or janitorial or camp counselors?  Hey, would you like to  go to an event that is just for people like you that work in the same, they'd be like, yes, I would love to congregate with  my people, you know, one of the biggest

David Adler:  events in the world is  called the cement,  it's in  Vegas and it's all the people in the cement business.  So you're  thinking that we  don't have to, the glamour is everywhere. You know, when you think about  it, you can turn anything into glamour and people want to gather no matter  who they are.  So that's so that's  another, another thing that I realized is one of the  reasons that this, we're  in the renaissance because people  are realizing  especially, you know, birds of a feather want to flock together and  it doesn't matter and organizers  need to help it along a little bit so that it's not just a boring, you  know, just a  boring thing

Rachel Moore:  well and you're  look at it that way to event planners were providing a service  by putting that platform or that space or that instance together, that just gives them, can they just  click on a link or go through a door and now  they're in that space, you helped make that happen, and like  you said, that's that  lasting memory too, or there would be like, I  wouldn't have been able to congregate with my birds of a feather, had you not put this together for me? I just rhymed  

David Adler:  yeah, new things that we can figure out what's  right, and the way we talk,  it's kind of like you just created the birth of rapping,

Rachel Moore:  Oh God,  yeah, nobody wants to hear me  rap, that was literally the limit, I can do everybody.  Uh I'm I'm more of a dr  Seuss person myself where it's, you know, it's just the redfish, bluefish and all that stuff, but  but yeah, but you're right, I  mean, and again, thinking about all that, you talked about  musicians coming full circle  that, but also, you know, just there's  so many groups out there  that they can get together and I can just come and watch and enjoy their talent  where I'm where I'm  lacking.

David Adler:  So the third thing that I see happening to support this idea that we're in a great renaissance is that  that you're having um  cities are going to change this whole remote working has changed something, so there's been a lot of talk about how  cities and  offices are going to be hump becoming hubs for socializing, learning and entertainment,  the biggest  thing that's happened in the rebirth of cities after something happens is that it changes for the positive, like the Industrial revolution, all the big businesses left after  the Industrial Revolution,  they left cities  and what happened to those buildings, they were  turned into great condos and great, you know,  great studios  and fun places to live and  that's the cool, there are the coolest places in new york, so I think  you're gonna see a lot of that and  that translates into events  in many cases.  Also, I think what's going to  happen is that these empty  spaces that are happening are going to become  basically  exhibition  halls for industries that  are permanent,  but you're  gonna have to make them so they  change. So a  company is going to have  a trade show booth  with  all the other companies  in their field and they're gonna be competing and that's going to be from  a remote worker point of view, they won't go to  their office, they'll go to this  trade show booth to  gather to meet customers and things like  that and it's gonna be really cool  and dynamic,  but you know, the fourth floor of of the  Pan Am building  will be the  place that the,  that the cement guys meet, you know, that  you're going to see  more and more of that and it's going to happen, it's going to be also good for the event  ecosystem.

Rachel Moore:  How do you um David, I want to ask you to, So I know we're talking about like cities and metropolis and stuff like that, but when it comes to like more rural communities may be smaller towns, how do you see them  kind of figuring into  that, that, that  renaissance that's coming and it will those  strictly be limited to virtual do you think or do you think we might see some more micro  um, you know, events that transformed those communities are, are sprouting up in, in rural areas. I think you're

David Adler:  gonna see a lot  more actually actually was  discussing the idea of  doing  trade show tourism  because all of a  sudden you have said, you know,  maybe I want to be a  welder and  then I'd like to go to the  welding conference. I would never have  thought about going to the welding  conference, but that opens up  my mind to a whole different thing or so there's ways that you're  going to see conferences all around.  I also think you're gonna see  my smaller  cities are going to become  a place where big  trade shows are going to happen because it gets, makes you feel like  you're, you're owning the town  as opposed to,  so there's a little bit of a, of, of,  you know, both, both sides happening. I think that's going to definitely really work.  The other thing that I think is going to happen is that,  uh, you know how in recipes, everybody wants to deconstruct the recipes well, people want to deconstruct deep construct events  now. So these huge  events are going to becoming lots of smaller, intimate events and people are going to want to, you know, divide up  in the birds of a feather, in their own industry, like all the communications people, all the marketing people, all the, you know, all the, all the HR people, you're going to see more and more of that. So these big,  huge events are going to be  smaller  with a bigger  envelope maybe, but they're going to be smaller. So there'll be more of these smaller events because people ultimately want  intimacy.  Yes, If you know how you go  to a big event for 10,000 people  and you never get to talk to anybody.

Rachel Moore:  Yeah,  well that's a great point. Like I'm  actually, I'm going to attend a virtual conferences for marketers. Um, but  I know there's gonna be  tons of people there, thousands of people  attending, but I'm  already planning like  I know a couple of the people who are also  attending virtually and we're  just going to plan our own  virtual little space where we can be like, okay,  why don't you go to that  one, go to that session, I'll go to this session, Let's come  back and compare notes  and talk about what we got  out of it because,  you know, yes, we can get the stuff on demand later, but we want that little space where you'd be  like, let's talk, let's do some insider chatter about this. This is really cool.  

David Adler:  The most successful digital platforms are the ones that break up into smaller groups. Yes. And and you get to know people in a way that you're  really, you can't  hide  uh in a in a digital meeting room  because they go around the room and they say, how about you? And so you got to pay attention to the whole time. So I think that that's really going to be  interesting.  Um

Rachel Moore:  and David,  sorry, go ahead,

David Adler:  Go ahead. And it brings up my 5th point is that  we're in the age of the collaboration artist, I call it  the person that  is the facilitator becomes more important than ever because it's, you can have all the beautiful googles and things like that. But if, if nobody knows how to get people get the  girls to dance with the boys  at the elementary school or junior high school dance, then nothing happens.  So I believe that that the  whole idea of  being a facilitator and  knowing how  to connect people is going to be one of these skills that are going to be beyond valuable.

SUBTOPIC: Influencer Marketing - Is It All About the Kardashians... 00:24:09-00:32:02

David Adler:  The other thing that we found that is also encouraging me on this whole thing, is that  yet the  whole influencer marketing, we always  think is all about the Kardashians.  I actually was thinking about that, I was told about this guy that, that, that is doing social  media for something  called,  um, it's called fab Con, I think it's called Fabulous. But you think about fabulosity and all that, It's about welders and fabricators. And so they all have  their own influencers  and their own instagrams and they're all really cool kick as welders, they added up and you know, they're doing, they're like welding stuff  and so those are people also that are superstars in those  industries, so people are using  event, um, influencer  marketing to capture  these small niches to micro  influencers and yes,  that's another reason to say that, you know, we're doing microcosms of the big things that you see in the consumer world well,

Rachel Moore:  and you know, again, you're, you're giving  such good insight  to anyone who's listening  or watching this,  uh, and realizing that you don't have to be a marketer to want to go to an event. And I think a lot of us, particularly in marketing, we get, tend to get real myopic to think, oh, well, I've got to put on an event that only other, only other marketers would appreciate, oh heck no, I mean there's, there's of course, yes creators and marketers out there are real used to these events,  but like you said,  there's all these other groups of people that um, we all know, we probably interact with them  every single day and if you  were to say, hey,  if we could put together an event that you could go to, you know, electricians or you know, garbage collectors or anything like that or, or janitorial or camp counselors?  Hey, would you like to  go to an event that is just for people like you that work in the same, they'd be like, yes, I would love to congregate with  my people, you know, one of the biggest

David Adler:  events in the world is  called the cement,  it's in  Vegas and it's all the people in the cement business.  So you're  thinking that we  don't have to, the glamour is everywhere. You know, when you think about  it, you can turn anything into glamour and people want to gather no matter  who they are.  So that's so that's  another, another thing that I realized is one of the  reasons that this, we're  in the renaissance because people  are realizing  especially, you know, birds of a feather want to flock together and  it doesn't matter and organizers  need to help it along a little bit so that it's not just a boring, you  know, just a  boring thing

Rachel Moore:  well and you're  look at it that way to event planners were providing a service  by putting that platform or that space or that instance together, that just gives them, can they just  click on a link or go through a door and now  they're in that space, you helped make that happen, and like  you said, that's that  lasting memory too, or there would be like, I  wouldn't have been able to congregate with my birds of a feather, had you not put this together for me? I just rhymed  

David Adler:  yeah, new things that we can figure out what's  right, and the way we talk,  it's kind of like you just created the birth of rapping,

Rachel Moore:  Oh God,  yeah, nobody wants to hear me  rap, that was literally the limit, I can do everybody.  Uh I'm I'm more of a dr  Seuss person myself where it's, you know, it's just the redfish, bluefish and all that stuff, but  but yeah, but you're right, I  mean, and again, thinking about all that, you talked about  musicians coming full circle  that, but also, you know, just there's  so many groups out there  that they can get together and I can just come and watch and enjoy their talent  where I'm where I'm  lacking.

David Adler:  So the third thing that I see happening to support this idea that we're in a great renaissance is that  that you're having um  cities are going to change this whole remote working has changed something, so there's been a lot of talk about how  cities and  offices are going to be hump becoming hubs for socializing, learning and entertainment,  the biggest  thing that's happened in the rebirth of cities after something happens is that it changes for the positive, like the Industrial revolution, all the big businesses left after  the Industrial Revolution,  they left cities  and what happened to those buildings, they were  turned into great condos and great, you know,  great studios  and fun places to live and  that's the cool, there are the coolest places in new york, so I think  you're gonna see a lot of that and  that translates into events  in many cases.  Also, I think what's going to  happen is that these empty  spaces that are happening are going to become  basically  exhibition  halls for industries that  are permanent,  but you're  gonna have to make them so they  change. So a  company is going to have  a trade show booth  with  all the other companies  in their field and they're gonna be competing and that's going to be from  a remote worker point of view, they won't go to  their office, they'll go to this  trade show booth to  gather to meet customers and things like  that and it's gonna be really cool  and dynamic,  but you know, the fourth floor of of the  Pan Am building  will be the  place that the,  that the cement guys meet, you know, that  you're going to see  more and more of that and it's going to happen, it's going to be also good for the event  ecosystem.

Rachel Moore:  How do you um David, I want to ask you to, So I know we're talking about like cities and metropolis and stuff like that, but when it comes to like more rural communities may be smaller towns, how do you see them  kind of figuring into  that, that, that  renaissance that's coming and it will those  strictly be limited to virtual do you think or do you think we might see some more micro  um, you know, events that transformed those communities are, are sprouting up in, in rural areas. I think you're

David Adler:  gonna see a lot  more actually actually was  discussing the idea of  doing  trade show tourism  because all of a  sudden you have said, you know,  maybe I want to be a  welder and  then I'd like to go to the  welding conference. I would never have  thought about going to the welding  conference, but that opens up  my mind to a whole different thing or so there's ways that you're  going to see conferences all around.  I also think you're gonna see  my smaller  cities are going to become  a place where big  trade shows are going to happen because it gets, makes you feel like  you're, you're owning the town  as opposed to,  so there's a little bit of a, of, of,  you know, both, both sides happening. I think that's going to definitely really work.  The other thing that I think is going to happen is that,  uh, you know how in recipes, everybody wants to deconstruct the recipes well, people want to deconstruct deep construct events  now. So these huge  events are going to becoming lots of smaller, intimate events and people are going to want to, you know, divide up  in the birds of a feather, in their own industry, like all the communications people, all the marketing people, all the, you know, all the, all the HR people, you're going to see more and more of that. So these big,  huge events are going to be  smaller  with a bigger  envelope maybe, but they're going to be smaller. So there'll be more of these smaller events because people ultimately want  intimacy.  Yes, If you know how you go  to a big event for 10,000 people  and you never get to talk to anybody.

Rachel Moore:  Yeah,  well that's a great point. Like I'm  actually, I'm going to attend a virtual conferences for marketers. Um, but  I know there's gonna be  tons of people there, thousands of people  attending, but I'm  already planning like  I know a couple of the people who are also  attending virtually and we're  just going to plan our own  virtual little space where we can be like, okay,  why don't you go to that  one, go to that session, I'll go to this session, Let's come  back and compare notes  and talk about what we got  out of it because,  you know, yes, we can get the stuff on demand later, but we want that little space where you'd be  like, let's talk, let's do some insider chatter about this. This is really cool.  

David Adler:  The most successful digital platforms are the ones that break up into smaller groups. Yes. And and you get to know people in a way that you're  really, you can't  hide  uh in a in a digital meeting room  because they go around the room and they say, how about you? And so you got to pay attention to the whole time. So I think that that's really going to be  interesting.  Um

Rachel Moore:  and David,  sorry, go ahead,

David Adler:  Go ahead. And it brings up my 5th point is that  we're in the age of the collaboration artist, I call it  the person that  is the facilitator becomes more important than ever because it's, you can have all the beautiful googles and things like that. But if, if nobody knows how to get people get the  girls to dance with the boys  at the elementary school or junior high school dance, then nothing happens.  So I believe that that the  whole idea of  being a facilitator and  knowing how  to connect people is going to be one of these skills that are going to be beyond valuable.

SUBTOPIC: Collaboration Artists 00:32:03-00:33:14

Rachel Moore:  Yes, thank you for  saying that. I actually made  that reference to, I  think it was just in the last week, I was saying, you know how  when you do go to a dance floor  and I said, you know, whether it's at a  wedding, we talked about that  or just at a school dance or  something, nobody  wants to go first, but it always takes that first person  or couple or whatever group that will go out  and start dancing. And that makes everyone else feel like, okay, now I can  go,  anyone who felt like I needed someone to kick this off for me, you're so  right, that that  kind of just a catalyst person  can, can really

David Adler:  get things going or being I call that event organizers have to become collaboration artists, whether they're collaborating and creating the event or they're helping their audience collaborate to talk to each other.  Yeah.  And that, to me is the soft skill  that is going to become the most valuable thing that you can ever have happened, I think

Rachel Moore:  events

David Adler:  and and it and it makes  sense. I mean, how many  times the great teacher is a collaboration artist?  The great orchestra leader is the ultimate collaboration, But it's how do you  orchestrate it  in a way that it doesn't  happen by accident.  Yeah. That that there are techniques to  operating to running a  meeting. Most people don't even know how to run a meeting.  Uh huh.

SUBTOPIC: Collaboration Artists 00:32:03-00:33:14

Rachel Moore:  Yes, thank you for  saying that. I actually made  that reference to, I  think it was just in the last week, I was saying, you know how  when you do go to a dance floor  and I said, you know, whether it's at a  wedding, we talked about that  or just at a school dance or  something, nobody  wants to go first, but it always takes that first person  or couple or whatever group that will go out  and start dancing. And that makes everyone else feel like, okay, now I can  go,  anyone who felt like I needed someone to kick this off for me, you're so  right, that that  kind of just a catalyst person  can, can really

David Adler:  get things going or being I call that event organizers have to become collaboration artists, whether they're collaborating and creating the event or they're helping their audience collaborate to talk to each other.  Yeah.  And that, to me is the soft skill  that is going to become the most valuable thing that you can ever have happened, I think

Rachel Moore:  events

David Adler:  and and it and it makes  sense. I mean, how many  times the great teacher is a collaboration artist?  The great orchestra leader is the ultimate collaboration, But it's how do you  orchestrate it  in a way that it doesn't  happen by accident.  Yeah. That that there are techniques to  operating to running a  meeting. Most people don't even know how to run a meeting.  Uh huh.

SUBTOPIC: The Wisdom of the Crowd 00:33:14-00:35:01

David Adler:  Uh huh.  You're so right,  then  people are that are introverted  and have to be dealt with differently than

Rachel Moore:  people that are extroverted.  That's right. And  also, and to not treat one group like  they're better than the other.  Everybody's got value, but that person who can bring them all together and make them feel like they're each important equally  for sure.  David, um I know, and we're actually, you know, we have, we're kind of limited on time today too. And I want to have

David Adler:  one

Rachel Moore:  more, Bring it, bring it for you guys. Okay.  

David Adler:  I think that the virtual event platforms, our poet poised  to be one of the most  powerful ways to  solve problems because they  capture the wisdom of  the crowd.  I  believe that if you  get the right collaboration artists in the  right digital platform, you can do the largest brain  trauma in the world  and and solve things like climate change  and  everything because it  is one of the  greatest tools  that has been ever  that has ever been invented in  order to capture the wisdom  of the crowd.

Rachel Moore:  That's so true.  Well, in the barrier for entry is  less with a virtual event,  you literally can get more people in the room or minds  in the room, can  I just say, um you below wouldn't, it would be great if like we were the platform where climate change got solved because of a particular meeting we had. I'm I'm staking our claim right now that we are going to be that platform that they will talk in years to come,  that we have gained back because we stop climate  change or that we  solved it, that they're gonna say and it all began back in an event that was hosted in the hub below platform? And David. I'm staking my claim. We have dibs on that right now.  I love it. I know, but hey, I'm all about, hey, if we can  solve climate change, wherever it happens, let's do that together. But you're right, Virtual events, I think, um again, just bringing people together that may not have gotten together otherwise,  but  because that barrier to entry  is lowered and

SUBTOPIC: Bring It, Bring It For You 00:33:14-00:35:01

David Adler:  Uh huh.  You're so right,  then  people are that are introverted  and have to be dealt with differently than

Rachel Moore:  people that are extroverted.  That's right. And  also, and to not treat one group like  they're better than the other.  Everybody's got value, but that person who can bring them all together and make them feel like they're each important equally  for sure.  David, um I know, and we're actually, you know, we have, we're kind of limited on time today too. And I want to have

David Adler:  one

Rachel Moore:  more, Bring it, bring it for you guys. Okay.  

David Adler:  I think that the virtual event platforms, our poet poised  to be one of the most  powerful ways to  solve problems because they  capture the wisdom of  the crowd.  I  believe that if you  get the right collaboration artists in the  right digital platform, you can do the largest brain  trauma in the world  and and solve things like climate change  and  everything because it  is one of the  greatest tools  that has been ever  that has ever been invented in  order to capture the wisdom  of the crowd.

Rachel Moore:  That's so true.  Well, in the barrier for entry is  less with a virtual event,  you literally can get more people in the room or minds  in the room, can  I just say, um you below wouldn't, it would be great if like we were the platform where climate change got solved because of a particular meeting we had. I'm I'm staking our claim right now that we are going to be that platform that they will talk in years to come,  that we have gained back because we stop climate  change or that we  solved it, that they're gonna say and it all began back in an event that was hosted in the hub below platform? And David. I'm staking my claim. We have dibs on that right now.  I love it. I know, but hey, I'm all about, hey, if we can  solve climate change, wherever it happens, let's do that together. But you're right, Virtual events, I think, um again, just bringing people together that may not have gotten together otherwise,  but  because that barrier to entry  is lowered and

SUBTOPIC: Are You Going to Be Publishing an Article? 00:35:01-00:35:46

Rachel Moore:  where can we  find more about  what you're talking about today with  this renaissance of the events industry? Are  you going to be  publishing this somewhere?

David Adler:  Yes, I'm publishing an article. I'm starting to talk about it everywhere.  And I think it's something where I just want more information for other people. Let help me do it because I think it's something that we have to raise the self esteem of our industry,  which is more important because we've been battered.  Uh and and we have a whole new group of people coming in to to take it to the next level. And I think the digital platforms have been the catalyst to do that because you're making us realize that there's a whole lot of other stuff out there that we can do that. We're not limited to a physical event.

Rachel Moore:  For sure. No, I challenge  accepted. And David thank you so

SUBTOPIC: Are You Going to Be Publishing an Article? 00:35:01-00:35:46

Rachel Moore:  where can we  find more about  what you're talking about today with  this renaissance of the events industry? Are  you going to be  publishing this somewhere?

David Adler:  Yes, I'm publishing an article. I'm starting to talk about it everywhere.  And I think it's something where I just want more information for other people. Let help me do it because I think it's something that we have to raise the self esteem of our industry,  which is more important because we've been battered.  Uh and and we have a whole new group of people coming in to to take it to the next level. And I think the digital platforms have been the catalyst to do that because you're making us realize that there's a whole lot of other stuff out there that we can do that. We're not limited to a physical event.

Rachel Moore:  For sure. No, I challenge  accepted. And David thank you so


TOPIC: BizBash 00:35:46-00:39:45

SUBTOPIC: Where Can We Find BizBash? 00:35:46-00:36:50

Rachel Moore:  lot to talk about and  think about and react to um  where can we  find your information?  Like where can we connect with you  online to learn  more about this bash and what you're offering?

David Adler:  I well, biz bash dot com is our website.  Um I'm available. I'll even give you my email address. How about that? Because I want people to  get back to me with their  ideas. It's called. It's D Adler, David D. Adler at dispatch dot com. I'm on linkedin. I don't know the exact address, but it's David Adler, I'm on  Instagram. David. Adler one. I'm on Twitter at David Adler, I'm on, I mean, I even have a tiktok account, but I don't know what it is, but I think  it's pretty cool.  I gotta say is one of the greatest new ways  for communicating messages and learning.

Rachel Moore:  Well, Hubble  has got an account on there too.  I'll make sure we find you and let's find each other and friend up here.  We'll  do that. And um  David, before I do let you go, I  did want to ask a couple more  personal questions that can give us some insight into you. Um  what are you?

SUBTOPIC: Biz Bash 00:35:46-00:36:34

Rachel Moore:  lot to talk about and  think about and react to um  where can we  find your information?  Like where can we connect with you  online to learn  more about this bash and what you're offering?

David Adler:  I well, biz bash dot com is our website.  Um I'm available. I'll even give you my email address. How about that? Because I want people to  get back to me with their  ideas. It's called. It's D Adler, David D. Adler at dispatch dot com. I'm on linkedin. I don't know the exact address, but it's David Adler, I'm on  Instagram. David. Adler one. I'm on Twitter at David Adler, I'm on, I mean, I even have a tiktok account, but I don't know what it is, but I think  it's pretty cool.  I gotta say is one of the greatest new ways  for communicating messages and learning.

SUBTOPIC: Hubble Has Got an Account 00:36:35-00:37:54

Rachel Moore:  Well, Hubble  has got an account on there too.  I'll make sure we find you and let's find each other and friend up here.  We'll  do that. And um  David, before I do let you go, I  did want to ask a couple more  personal questions that can give us some insight into you. Um  what are you?  Everyone seems to be binging stuff. Sometimes some people don't have time to binge things, but I'd love to know. Like, is there something special  you're listening to  watching or reading right now that's kind of sticking with you.

David Adler:  Yeah. You know, one of the things I'm listening to on on on on audible  as I'm listening to the court, a book on the I don't forget the actual name of it, but it's about on the Court  of Henry the Eighth  and it's  it's it's an audio book that I'm listening to that talks all about the soft power of how  that Court of Henry  the Eighth was how the people that took care of his bedroom, the people that took care of his uh his advisors, how he played sports and how he played tennis  and how he filled his day.  It's so fascinating, it's  so interesting.  I love it.  And then  what else? Oh, I just watch, I'm watching billions, I just started watching billions again  and I love all those shows. I think I'll do I do believe that this whole binge tv is addictive and not good for you.  Yeah, it  can be bad.

SUBTOPIC: What Are You Watching/Reading Right Now? 00:36:50-00:37:54

Rachel Moore:  you're listening to  watching or reading right now that's kind of sticking with you.

David Adler:  Yeah. You know, one of the things I'm listening to on on on on audible  as I'm listening to the court, a book on the I don't forget the actual name of it, but it's about on the Court  of Henry the Eighth  and it's  it's it's an audio book that I'm listening to that talks all about the soft power of how  that Court of Henry  the Eighth was how the people that took care of his bedroom, the people that took care of his uh his advisors, how he played sports and how he played tennis  and how he filled his day.  It's so fascinating, it's  so interesting.  I love it.  And then  what else? Oh, I just watch, I'm watching billions, I just started watching billions again  and I love all those shows. I think I'll do I do believe that this whole binge tv is addictive and not good for you.  Yeah, it  can be bad.

SUBTOPIC: The Renaissance of Events 00:37:54-00:39:45

David Adler:  good escape  momentarily. But yeah, when you get so much, it's like I also just got a new puppy  uh  Sharpay, a miniature  Shar Pei named Armand de and I named him our money because I was reading that thomas, jefferson autobiography, biography and he had bought, brought four puppies from France back to the us to Virginia,  where I have another  house  and he the name was Armand de so I named the dog

Rachel Moore:  So we can we see your dog on your instagram?

David Adler:  That's why we should go follow you. Yes, there's a, has he has his own instagram site called um,  Commander are  Mindy.

Rachel Moore:  Oh, that's so cool. Oh, I  love pet. I love  pets on instagram. I think they're amazing.

David Adler:  Well,

Rachel Moore:  it's funny  because even my boss,  we were just, we've been on some  calls last week where  we've seen people's  plus ones, whether that's a  baby or a toddler  or their, you know, older  child or their  pet or just something. And can  we just say again? I  think what you're talking about the renaissance of  events. I think we have a  renaissance of experiencing each other online  where it's okay  to be sharing these other more personal aspects to ourselves, the things and the people  in the, in the, you know, the  loved ones that make up who we are are showing up more. And I love  that too. So I can't wait  to see your puppy.  I'm gonna go look it up because  I think that'll that'll  tell me more about you. Oh my gosh, yes, You're putting it, oh,  okay. Everybody,  everybody needs to go follow  this dog on instagram and so cute. Oh my gosh, now I want a dog.  Well, David,  thank you so much for taking some time  with us today. Um, and, and we're going to  obviously have this up on our podcast  on our live stream. But I am  looking forward to seeing and hearing and reading more about the renaissance of the events industry,  because I think we're  going to be part of it. But thank  you so  much.

SUBTOPIC: New Puppy 00:37:55-00:38:39

David Adler:  good escape  momentarily. But yeah, when you get so much, it's like I also just got a new puppy  uh  Sharpay, a miniature  Shar Pei named Armand de and I named him our money because I was reading that thomas, jefferson autobiography, biography and he had bought, brought four puppies from France back to the us to Virginia,  where I have another  house  and he the name was Armand de so I named the dog

Rachel Moore:  So we can we see your dog on your instagram?

David Adler:  That's why we should go follow you. Yes, there's a, has he has his own instagram site called um,  Commander are  Mindy.

Rachel Moore:  Oh, that's so cool. Oh, I  love pet. I love  pets on instagram. I think they're amazing.

SUBTOPIC: The Renaissance of Events 00:38:39-00:39:45

David Adler:  Well,

Rachel Moore:  it's funny  because even my boss,  we were just, we've been on some  calls last week where  we've seen people's  plus ones, whether that's a  baby or a toddler  or their, you know, older  child or their  pet or just something. And can  we just say again? I  think what you're talking about the renaissance of  events. I think we have a  renaissance of experiencing each other online  where it's okay  to be sharing these other more personal aspects to ourselves, the things and the people  in the, in the, you know, the  loved ones that make up who we are are showing up more. And I love  that too. So I can't wait  to see your puppy.  I'm gonna go look it up because  I think that'll that'll  tell me more about you. Oh my gosh, yes, You're putting it, oh,  okay. Everybody,  everybody needs to go follow  this dog on instagram and so cute. Oh my gosh, now I want a dog.  Well, David,  thank you so much for taking some time  with us today. Um, and, and we're going to  obviously have this up on our podcast  on our live stream. But I am  looking forward to seeing and hearing and reading more about the renaissance of the events industry,  because I think we're  going to be part of it. But thank  you so  much.


TOPIC: Biz Bash Hubble Has Got an Account 00:35:46-00:39:45

SUBTOPIC: Where Can We Find BizBash? 00:35:46-00:36:50

Rachel Moore:  lot to talk about and  think about and react to um  where can we  find your information?  Like where can we connect with you  online to learn  more about this bash and what you're offering?

David Adler:  I well, biz bash dot com is our website.  Um I'm available. I'll even give you my email address. How about that? Because I want people to  get back to me with their  ideas. It's called. It's D Adler, David D. Adler at dispatch dot com. I'm on linkedin. I don't know the exact address, but it's David Adler, I'm on  Instagram. David. Adler one. I'm on Twitter at David Adler, I'm on, I mean, I even have a tiktok account, but I don't know what it is, but I think  it's pretty cool.  I gotta say is one of the greatest new ways  for communicating messages and learning.

Rachel Moore:  Well, Hubble  has got an account on there too.  I'll make sure we find you and let's find each other and friend up here.  We'll  do that. And um  David, before I do let you go, I  did want to ask a couple more  personal questions that can give us some insight into you. Um  what are you?

SUBTOPIC: Biz Bash 00:35:46-00:36:34

Rachel Moore:  lot to talk about and  think about and react to um  where can we  find your information?  Like where can we connect with you  online to learn  more about this bash and what you're offering?

David Adler:  I well, biz bash dot com is our website.  Um I'm available. I'll even give you my email address. How about that? Because I want people to  get back to me with their  ideas. It's called. It's D Adler, David D. Adler at dispatch dot com. I'm on linkedin. I don't know the exact address, but it's David Adler, I'm on  Instagram. David. Adler one. I'm on Twitter at David Adler, I'm on, I mean, I even have a tiktok account, but I don't know what it is, but I think  it's pretty cool.  I gotta say is one of the greatest new ways  for communicating messages and learning.

SUBTOPIC: Hubble Has Got an Account 00:36:35-00:37:54

Rachel Moore:  Well, Hubble  has got an account on there too.  I'll make sure we find you and let's find each other and friend up here.  We'll  do that. And um  David, before I do let you go, I  did want to ask a couple more  personal questions that can give us some insight into you. Um  what are you?  Everyone seems to be binging stuff. Sometimes some people don't have time to binge things, but I'd love to know. Like, is there something special  you're listening to  watching or reading right now that's kind of sticking with you.

David Adler:  Yeah. You know, one of the things I'm listening to on on on on audible  as I'm listening to the court, a book on the I don't forget the actual name of it, but it's about on the Court  of Henry the Eighth  and it's  it's it's an audio book that I'm listening to that talks all about the soft power of how  that Court of Henry  the Eighth was how the people that took care of his bedroom, the people that took care of his uh his advisors, how he played sports and how he played tennis  and how he filled his day.  It's so fascinating, it's  so interesting.  I love it.  And then  what else? Oh, I just watch, I'm watching billions, I just started watching billions again  and I love all those shows. I think I'll do I do believe that this whole binge tv is addictive and not good for you.  Yeah, it  can be bad.

SUBTOPIC: What Are You Watching/Reading Right Now? 00:36:50-00:37:54

Rachel Moore:  you're listening to  watching or reading right now that's kind of sticking with you.

David Adler:  Yeah. You know, one of the things I'm listening to on on on on audible  as I'm listening to the court, a book on the I don't forget the actual name of it, but it's about on the Court  of Henry the Eighth  and it's  it's it's an audio book that I'm listening to that talks all about the soft power of how  that Court of Henry  the Eighth was how the people that took care of his bedroom, the people that took care of his uh his advisors, how he played sports and how he played tennis  and how he filled his day.  It's so fascinating, it's  so interesting.  I love it.  And then  what else? Oh, I just watch, I'm watching billions, I just started watching billions again  and I love all those shows. I think I'll do I do believe that this whole binge tv is addictive and not good for you.  Yeah, it  can be bad.

SUBTOPIC: The Renaissance of Events 00:37:54-00:39:45

David Adler:  good escape  momentarily. But yeah, when you get so much, it's like I also just got a new puppy  uh  Sharpay, a miniature  Shar Pei named Armand de and I named him our money because I was reading that thomas, jefferson autobiography, biography and he had bought, brought four puppies from France back to the us to Virginia,  where I have another  house  and he the name was Armand de so I named the dog

Rachel Moore:  So we can we see your dog on your instagram?

David Adler:  That's why we should go follow you. Yes, there's a, has he has his own instagram site called um,  Commander are  Mindy.

Rachel Moore:  Oh, that's so cool. Oh, I  love pet. I love  pets on instagram. I think they're amazing.

David Adler:  Well,

Rachel Moore:  it's funny  because even my boss,  we were just, we've been on some  calls last week where  we've seen people's  plus ones, whether that's a  baby or a toddler  or their, you know, older  child or their  pet or just something. And can  we just say again? I  think what you're talking about the renaissance of  events. I think we have a  renaissance of experiencing each other online  where it's okay  to be sharing these other more personal aspects to ourselves, the things and the people  in the, in the, you know, the  loved ones that make up who we are are showing up more. And I love  that too. So I can't wait  to see your puppy.  I'm gonna go look it up because  I think that'll that'll  tell me more about you. Oh my gosh, yes, You're putting it, oh,  okay. Everybody,  everybody needs to go follow  this dog on instagram and so cute. Oh my gosh, now I want a dog.  Well, David,  thank you so much for taking some time  with us today. Um, and, and we're going to  obviously have this up on our podcast  on our live stream. But I am  looking forward to seeing and hearing and reading more about the renaissance of the events industry,  because I think we're  going to be part of it. But thank  you so  much.

SUBTOPIC: New Puppy 00:37:55-00:38:39

David Adler:  good escape  momentarily. But yeah, when you get so much, it's like I also just got a new puppy  uh  Sharpay, a miniature  Shar Pei named Armand de and I named him our money because I was reading that thomas, jefferson autobiography, biography and he had bought, brought four puppies from France back to the us to Virginia,  where I have another  house  and he the name was Armand de so I named the dog

Rachel Moore:  So we can we see your dog on your instagram?

David Adler:  That's why we should go follow you. Yes, there's a, has he has his own instagram site called um,  Commander are  Mindy.

Rachel Moore:  Oh, that's so cool. Oh, I  love pet. I love  pets on instagram. I think they're amazing.

SUBTOPIC: The Renaissance of Events 00:38:39-00:39:45

David Adler:  Well,

Rachel Moore:  it's funny  because even my boss,  we were just, we've been on some  calls last week where  we've seen people's  plus ones, whether that's a  baby or a toddler  or their, you know, older  child or their  pet or just something. And can  we just say again? I  think what you're talking about the renaissance of  events. I think we have a  renaissance of experiencing each other online  where it's okay  to be sharing these other more personal aspects to ourselves, the things and the people  in the, in the, you know, the  loved ones that make up who we are are showing up more. And I love  that too. So I can't wait  to see your puppy.  I'm gonna go look it up because  I think that'll that'll  tell me more about you. Oh my gosh, yes, You're putting it, oh,  okay. Everybody,  everybody needs to go follow  this dog on instagram and so cute. Oh my gosh, now I want a dog.  Well, David,  thank you so much for taking some time  with us today. Um, and, and we're going to  obviously have this up on our podcast  on our live stream. But I am  looking forward to seeing and hearing and reading more about the renaissance of the events industry,  because I think we're  going to be part of it. But thank  you so  much.

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